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Home » With a sweeping survey of Chinese contemporary art, Charles Saatchi opens much anticipated new gallery in Duke of York Headquarters Building, Chelsea, London

With a sweeping survey of Chinese contemporary art, Charles Saatchi opens much anticipated new gallery in Duke of York Headquarters Building, Chelsea, London

October 8th, 2008


A silica gel sculpture “Communication” by Cang Xn in the new Saatchi Gallery via Reuters

One of the most influential art collectors, Charles Saatchi, who years ago jump started the careers of the Young British Artists such as Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin, has opened his new gallery in Chelsea in Central, London. The neoclassical former military barracks from 1801 known as the Duke of York Headquarters building is the now home to Saatchi’s gallery and his opening exhibit called “The Revolution Continues: New Art From China.” Within the space, a standard “white cube” internal architecture, the inaugural group show features works of art from the most of the top contemporary Chinese artists. Duke of York Headquarters buildings provides an impressive 70,000 square feet of space of gallery space, and in its past life was the military headquarters and barracks for the Duke’s soldiers.

Also notable is that the new Saatchi Gallery, a huge space that compares with City or National arts spaces in its scope and quality of offerings, is entirely free, due to a corporate sponsorship by Phillips de Pury & Company, which only this week was purchased by the Mercury Group of Russia, as reported by Art Observed yesterday here.

Saatchi Gallery Website
Saatchi Gallery Opens at Duke of York’s HQ Building, Chelsea
[Artdaily]
Saatchi leads Chinese revolution with video here, and more video here [BBC]
Classical frame for Saatchi’s brand-new look [Financial Times]
Art guru Saatchi back with new gallery, China show [Reuters]
Saatchi’s New London Gallery Hails Britart, Chinese Revolution [Bloomberg]
Charles Saatchi’s old favourites – made in China [TimesUK]
Stuck with Saatchi [ArtReview]
The Revolution continues at the new Saatchi Gallery [TimesUK]
The verdict on Saatchi’s new gallery and Dog chews and Mao [Independent]
Saatchi Gallery: great space, shame about the art
and Saatchi gallery: a study in blandness [GuardianUK]
Last scene by Saatchi and Charles Saatchi: Did I say that? and Is it third time lucky for Saatchi gallery? [GuardianUK]
Saatchi Gallery Opening – London [Jean Pigozzi for Colette]
Update: Opening of the Week: Saatchi rolls out the red carpet [Independent]

Charles Saatchi’s first gallery was a converted former paint factory, launched in 1985. In 2005, Saatchi’s gallery was forced to vacate its previous location on the River Thames 2005 and this space marks a very dramatic return to the scene. The show has generally received positive reviews. Some in the press have noted that there are several Eastern equivalents to the work of some of Saatchi’s original artist discoveries, such as the Australian hyper-realist sculptor Ron Mueck whose work resembles some of the Sun Yuan and Peng Yu works in this show for example. Next year Saatchi Gallery will curate a show of contemporary Middle Eastern art, including from Iran and Iraq.


“Civilization” by Chinese artist Bai Yiluo (2007) in Charles Saatchi’s new art gallery via Artdaily


Two of 13 lifesize sculptures by Sun Yuan and Peng Yu called Old Persons Home in the new Saatchi Gallery via Reuters


Old Persons Home by Sun Yuan and Peng Yu via Times Online


‘Bloodline’ by Zhang Xiaogang hangs in the new Saatchi gallery, this painting is
very similar to the top lot in Sotheby’s Asian Art auction of last weekend via BBC


Chinese Offspring, by Zhang Dali, features 15 life-sized figures suspended upside down from the ceiling. Each one represents a migrant construction worker via BBC


Artist Liu Wei built Love It! Bite It! made from edible dog chews via BBC


The Revolution Continues : New Art from China via BBC


Art collector, Charles Saatchi via Bloomberg

Stainless steel sculpture called Oriental Rock No. 71 by Zhan Wang displayed as part of the exhibition in the new Saatchi Gallery, in London via Reuters

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