Global contemporary art events and news observed from New York City. Suggestion? Email us.
NEWS

Behind the Sale of a Major Florine Stettheimer Work

July 27th, 2016

Florine Stettheimer, Asbury Park South, via NYTThe New York Times reports on the quiet sale of a major Florine Stettheimer work from the collection of Nashville’s Fisk University, a sale that drew criticisms from many in the field.  “Shame on them,” says Lyndel King, director of the Weisman Museum at the University of Minnesota and chairwoman of the Task Force for the Protection of University Collections. “It’s very much against the ethics of our profession.”
Read More »

Researchers Identify Likely Model for Francis Picabia’s ‘Udnie’

July 27th, 2016

Udnie (Jeune fille americaine), via Art NewspaperThe Art Newspaper follows the story of Udnie, a long-unknown muse of Francis Picabia that scholars now believe was model and silent-film actress Audrey Munson.  Munson “posed for him for several days, but never in still position,” she is quoted.  “He had me walk about the studio in different lights, taking different postures. He wanted to paint me in action, he said, not in repose.”
Read More »

SWISS INSTITUTE TO LAUNCH NEW TEMPORARY GALLERY “SWISS IN SITU” IN TRIBECA

July 26th, 2016

Nieves_Innen_SI_2016-781x1024The Swiss Institute has announced the location and opening date of its new temporary gallery, “Swiss In situ.” Occupying a 5,000 sq. ft space in Tribeca, Swiss In situ will function as the institute’s main center until a more permanent location is announced next year. The temporary gallery plans to mirror its status as “transitional” through its exhibitions, by focusing them on fleeting and “temporary structures–including publishing formats, social experiments, and architectural forms.” The gallery will open with an exhibition by Swiss publishers, Nieves and Innen called, “Nieves and Innen Zine Library.” The exhibition will feature “hundreds of pocket-sized, image-based publications [Nieves and Innen] have commissioned over the past 15 years,” along with artist and publisher talks at the opening event on August 4.
Read More »

Robert Irwin Profiled in Art Newspaper

July 26th, 2016

Robert Irwin, via Art NewspaperRobert Irwin is profiled in the Art Newspaper this week, as he opens his major permanent installation at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa.  “What I’ve been doing all these years, you couldn’t sell, you couldn’t house it, you couldn’t put it in a museum,” he says. “Marfa was a good place for me to fantasize some idea of what I might do, which for a long time was all I had… It was a nice place for me to stretch my legs a little and try some things.”
Read More »

Uncertain Market for Modigliani Driving Research for Catalog Raisonné

July 26th, 2016

Amedeo Modigliani, via Art NewspaperThe current market stature for Modigliani is driving extensive research and pursuit of a catalog raisonné, the Art Newspaper reports.  “Let’s just say that an exciting first step has been taken, with further news to come,” scholar Kenneth Wayne says.
Read More »

The New York Times Profiles Green Gallery Founder Richard Bellamy

July 26th, 2016

Dick Bellamy, via NYTThe New York Times has a profile on Richard Bellamy this week, the founder of New York’s influential Green Gallery, and the dealer who first provided space and a voice for many of New York’s influential minimalists, including Donald Judd, Robert Morris, and many more.  “I think,” Robert Morris says of Bellamy’s impact on this group,  “it had to do with the fact that we — the artists and Bellamy himself, who we regarded as more of an artist than a ‘director’ — were sitting in a space on 57th Street, when we all belonged downtown in our ratty lofts. There was something slightly ridiculous about occupying that zone where the serious, moneyed New York galleries were located.”
Read More »

Louvre-Lens to Restore Long-Lost Charles Le Brun Piece

July 26th, 2016

Charles Le Brun undergoing restoration, via Art NewspaperThe Louvre-Lens has committed to restoring a Charles Le Brun work that had been missing for over 200 years, and which was discovered with so much dirt and grime on its surface that it was almost unrecognizable.  “This was a hugely successful painting,” says Nicolas Milovanovic, the chief curator in the Paris museum’s paintings department. “When [the art collector and chief minister of France] Cardinal Mazarin saw it, he wanted a copy. A third version was made for Anne of Austria. We know [there are] around ten other versions. It was a painting that pleased many people.”
Read More »

Observer Looks Inside the National Museum of American Illustration

July 26th, 2016

NMAI, via ObserverThe Observer takes a look inside the collection of dealer turned museum owner Judy Goffman Cutler, whose National Museum of American Illustration in Newport, Rhode Island holds an impressive collection of pieces from American artists.  “I have the second largest collection of Rockwells anywhere,” she says.  
Read More »

Bill Viola to Install New Companion to “Martyrs” at St. Paul Cathedral

July 26th, 2016

Bill Viola's Mary, 2016, via The GuardianArtist Bill Viola is set to unveil a new large-scale video installation at St Paul’s Cathedral, depicting Mary holding the body of Jesus after his crucifixion.  The piece is considered a companion to his Martyrs series.  “One is concerned with birth and the other death; one with comfort and creation, the other with suffering and sacrifice,” Viola says.  “If I am successful, the final pieces will function both as aesthetic objects of contemporary art and as practical objects of traditional contemplation and devotion.”
Read More »

Dieric Bouts Painting Stays in UK After Funding Help from UK Lotter

July 26th, 2016

Dieric Bouts’ St Luke Drawing the Virgin and Child, via The Guardian15th Century Flemish Master Dieric Bouts’s St Luke Drawing the Virgin and Child will stay in the United Kingdom, following funding help from the UK Lottery to prevent the export of the work outside of the country.  “It’s fantastic news that this stunning painting will remain in the UK for the public to see. I’m delighted that the export deferral has allowed this outstanding work of art to find a new home at the Bowes Museum,” says new Culture Minister Matt Hancock. 
Read More »

REFERENCE LIBRARY

Paris – Alex Katz: “New Landscapes” at Thaddaeus Ropac Through July 30th, 2016

July 28th, 2016

Alex Katz, Fall (2015), via Thaddaeus Ropac
Alex Katz, Fall (2015), via Thaddaeus Ropac

Continuing his recent surge of output, Alex Katz has brought a new series of landscapes to Thaddaeus Ropac’s Paris Marais exhibition space.  Bringing his attention yet again to the landscapes of Maine, the artist’s work here presents his calm, subdued style in a fitting conversation with the untouched curves and lines of Northern New England.

Alex Katz, New Landsacpes (Installation View), via Thaddaeus Ropac
Alex Katz, New Landsacpes (Installation View), via Thaddaeus Ropac

Read More »

New York – “Goulding the Lolly” at Gavin Brown Through July 30th, 2016

July 28th, 2016

Brian Belott, Untitled (After Guston) (1995), via Art Observed
Brian Belott, Untitled (After Guston) (1995), via Art Observed

Gavin Brown’s 291 Grand Street location is playing home to the gallery’s summer exhibition this month, a cunning and often comical play on art history curated by painter Brian Belott.  Inviting a group of artists to take their own improvisational runs on various artists from the last 100 years of painting and sculpture, the show plays on the memory of Glenn Gould, whose own takes on popular figures and music themes equally expressed his own artistic brilliance.

Bobo, The Legendary Impetus Behind Wegmans (2016), via Art Observed
Bobo, The Legendary Impetus Behind Wegmans (2016), via Art Observed

Read More »

New York – “False Narratives” at Pierogi Gallery Through July 31st, 2016

July 28th, 2016

Roxy Paine, Meeting (2016), via Art Observed
Roxy Paine, Meeting (2016), via Art Observed

The concept of “the narrative” is one that feels increasingly relevant in a contemporary art context defined in part by gestures and approaches that owe much to the last 60 years of creative practice.  Considering the work in relation to an isolated other, a sort of phantom context that either motivates, grounds or produces the work in question ultimately seems to be one such strategy for re-invigoration of the techniques used in creating the object itself.  This is the strategy through which the current group exhibition at Pierogi’s LES Gallery space, False Narratives, presents its artists, compiling work that not only explores the construction of ulterior situations and modes for the work itself, but equally questions these narratives as unreliable.

Brian Conley, Decipherment of Linear X (2004), via Art Observed
Brian Conley, Decipherment of Linear X (2004), via Art Observed

Read More »

AO On Site, Marfa, TX – Robert Irwin: Debut of “Dawn to Dusk” Permanent Installation at Chinati Foundation

July 26th, 2016

Robert Irwin, Dawn to Dusk (2016), via Art Observed
Robert Irwin, Dawn to Dusk (2016), via Art Observed

For the past two decades, Robert Irwin’s installation in the Texas town of Marfa has been something of a distant possibility, a long-rumored project commissioned by the Chinati Foundation, and focused around the dilapidated grounds of the former Fort D.A. Russell hospital where the organization makes its home.  Now complete, the massive installation work, Irwin’s only permanent, free-standing composition, has transformed the space into a placid marker of time, a place where meticulous architectural geometries make masterful use of the West Texas sun and landscape in a prime example of Irwin’s unique sculptural vocabulary.

Robert Irwin, Dawn to Dusk (2016), via Art Observed
Robert Irwin, Dawn to Dusk (2016), via Art Observed

Read More »

London – Nairy Baghramian: “Scruff of the Neck” at Marian Goodman Through July 29th, 2016

July 25th, 2016

Nairy Baghramian, Scruff of the Neck 1, via Marian Goodman
Nairy Baghramian, Scruff of the Neck (LR 30/31/32), All images via Marian Goodman Gallery

Now on view, Marian Goodman Gallery in London is presenting Scruff of the Neck, a series of site-responsive sculptures by artist Nairy Baghramian.   This is Baghramian’s first major solo show in London since The Walker’s Day Off at the Serpentine Gallery in 2010, and continues the Berlin-based Iranian artist’s practice in creating formally inventive sculptures that operate in both physiological and mechanical dimensions, articulating and reflecting the artist’s interest in exploring the space of the body in a non-habitual way. Read More »

New York – Jason Moran: “STAGED” at Luhring Augustine Through July 29th, 2016

July 24th, 2016

Jason Moran, STAGED Savoy Ballroom 1 (2015), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, STAGED: Savoy Ballroom 1 (2015), via Art Observed

In STAGED, on view at Luhring Augustine, artist and musician Jason Moran explores the history of jazz in America, in connection with explorations of the relationship between music, language and communication.    The show, on view at the gallery’s Bushwick location through the end of next week, marks his first solo exhibition, where his work as a musician is complimented by artworks and installations that reflect and expand upon his profound knowledge of jazz and jazz history.

Jason Moran, Run 4 (2016), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, Run 4 (2016), via Art Observed

Moran is best known as the MacArthur-winning jazz pianist and artistic director for jazz at the Kennedy Center.  In recent years, however, he has worked with visual artists like Theaster Gates, Glenn Ligon, Kara Walker, Stan Douglas and Adam Pendleton to expand his repertoire beyond the concert hall.  In 2015, Moran debuted sculptures and a series of works on paper at the Venice Biennale, works that now constitute part of STAGED, an ongoing project.

Moran Run 4 Right Hand
Jason Moran, Run 4, Right Hand (2016), via Luhring Augustine

Negotiating the limits of historical and artistic investigation, the show examines the forces of performance and process that drive at the cultural and social history of jazz, the mingling of physical locations and the immense talents that graced their stages, in conversation across decades. Moran has created two installations based on historic New York City jazz venues that are no longer in existence: the Savoy Ballroom (opened in Harlem in 1926, now known as an emblem of the swing era), and the Three Deuces (a comparatively modest venue located in midtown prominent from the 1930s-1950s). These installations present a mix of both mythical imagining and historically accurate representation of these spaces, in which so much of jazz history took place. Moran’s installations recreate the stages of these institutions sourced from photographs taken at the height of their popularity.  Over the course of the viewer’s time in the show, the piano will strike up into song, or voices will echo out from the Savoy’s ceiling, entering into a ghostly dialogue that transcends easy readings of time and space.

Jason Moran, The Temple (For Terry Adkins) (2016), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, The Temple (For Terry Adkins) (2016), via Art Observed

Jason Moran, Basin Street Runs 1 and 2 (2016), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, Basin Street Runs 1 and 2 (2016), via Art Observed

Memory and material residue feature prominently in this exhibition. Works are created by making runs on the piano with charcoal-covered fingers, or smearing the hands across piano rolls, as if the practice of musicianship was slurred across easy boundaries or notation, much in the way that Jazz so often upended the logical structure of early 20th Century music.  The smudges and flourishes of these works seem distinctly musical, as if the performative energy of the piece had been captured, a record of musical engagement that is charged with its musicality despite its purely material dimensions.

Jason Moran, STAGED: Three Deuces (2015), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, STAGED: Three Deuces (2015), via Art Observed

In STAGED, Moran resurrects the material of musical history and negotiates the traces it leaves behind. This exhibition represents a stunning example of the productive and fascinating ways in which history, memory, art and research can intersect.  Though it resists classification under the heading of contemporary art, the sculptural and visual dimension of Moran’s STAGED are striking examples of how the immateriality of music and history can be captured on paper and in space.

— A. Corrigan

Related Links:
Exhibition Page [Luhring Augustine]

 

New York — “A Modest Proposal” at Hauser & Wirth Through July 29th, 2016

July 24th, 2016

Jakub Julian Ziolkowski, Untitled (2015) © the Artist Courtesy Hauser & Wirth
Jakub Julian Ziolkowski, Untitled (2015) © the Artist Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

A Modest Proposal, Hauser & Wirth’s summer exhibition curated by staff members Madeline Warren and Yuta Nakajima, adopts its eloquent title from Jonathan Swift’s namesake essay from 1729.  Recognized for being one of the foremost satirists in English language, Swift vigorously mocked Ireland’s political climate at the time through his sharp wit in various forms of writing—perhaps most famously in the show’s namesake essay, where the writer suggests the poor profit off of their children by selling them as food to the wealthy. Read More »

New York: “People Who Work Here” at David Zwirner Through August 5th, 2016

July 22nd, 2016

Colin O'Con, Magma Arch (2015), via Art Observed
Colin O’Con, Magma Arch (2015), via Art Observed

In 2012, David Zwirner Gallery launched a novel concept for the summer group show.  Called People Who Work Here, the gallery opened its floors to its own employees, launching an exhibition of works that underscored the depth of talent of those working for the international mega-gallery.  Four years later, the gallery has picked up where the last exhibition left off, opening a new iteration of the show that welcomes over 35 artists to show their work at the gallery’s 19th Street location, just steps away from a massive new Jeff Koons sculpture in the gallery’s open garage exhibition space.  Curated by Marina Gluckman and Jaime Schwartz in gallery’s Research and Exhibitions department, the show takes a playful look at the gallery’s skilled employee based, and offers subtle historical parallels with its own selection of artists.

Joel Fennell, Still-life (after McCobb) (2016), via Art Observed
Joel Fennell, Still-life (after McCobb) (2016), via Art Observed

Read More »

New York – “Empirical Intuitive Abstraction” Organized by Matthew Ronay at Andrea Rosen Through August 5th, 2016

July 21st, 2016

Empirical Intuitive Absorption (Installation View), via Art Observed
Empirical Intuitive Absorption (Installation View), via Art Observed

On paper, the list of artists for Andrea Rosen’s summer exhibition, Empirical Intuitive Absorption, may raise an eyebrow or two: Fernand Léger showing alongside Graham Marks, Matthew Ronay contrasted with Serge Charchoune, all underscored by Terry Riley’s swirling compositions.  Organized by Ronay, whose recent lecture at the Perez Museum in Miami inspired the exhibition, the show takes concepts of intuition and execution as two sides of the same coin, of the replication and creation of natural models through blind aesthetic representation. Read More »

New York – Sam Lewitt: “Less Light Warm Words” and Mathis Althmann: “Foul Matters” at Swiss Institute Through July 24th, 2016

July 20th, 2016

Sam Lewitt, Less Light Warm Words (Installation View), via Art Observed
Sam Lewitt, Less Light Warm Words (Installation View), via Art Observed

The news that Swiss Institute would leave its location at 18 Wooster this summer joined a slow but steady list of high-profile departures from SoHo that included Artist’s Space and other longtime residents of the neighborhood.  With this movement from its home soon to be underway, Swiss Institute has turned its attention to a pair of exhibitions dealing with concepts of the institution, infrastructure, and urban locales as it takes its final bow in the space.  Giving the space upstairs over to artist Sam Lewitt’s installation Less Light Warm Words, while German artist Mathis Altmann takes over the gallery’s basement exhibition space, filling it with a bizarre series of pieces that mix the abject with the structural.

Mathis Altmann, Untitled (2016)
Mathis Altmann, Untitled (2016)

Read More »