Global contemporary art events and news observed from New York City. Suggestion? Email us.
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Jeffrey Deitch Interviewed in LA Times

September 20th, 2018

Deitch, via LA TimesJeffrey Deitch has an interview in the LA Times this week, as he tours the newspaper around his new space in Hollywood. “For people coming from different parts of America, coming from different countries,” he says, “this is a really L.A. space. And that’s what I wanted — an only-in-L.A. space.”
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Mary Kelly Interviewed in The Guardian

September 19th, 2018

Mary Kelly, via The GuardianArtist Mary Kelly is interviewed in The Guardian this week, discussing her own work and her views on the recent move towards increasingly hostile international relations and hard borderlines between countries. “Living all over very different places gives you insight about how different cultures and political systems work, but it also shows you in some way how things are connected,” she says. 
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Hauser & Wirth to Open Location in St. Moritz

September 19th, 2018

Rendering of Hauser and Wirth in St. Moritz, via Art NewsHauser & Wirth is planning a location in the resort town of St. Moritz, Switzerland, Art News reports. The 4,000 sq. ft space will be the ninth location for the gallery.
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Trump Trade Tariffs Spare Chinese Antiques and Art

September 19th, 2018

Christie's, via Art NewspaperChinese art and antiquities have been spared from Trump’s trade tariffs, the Art Newspaper reports. “The free exchange of art is beneficial to all and may provide an avenue toward mutual understanding leading to better relations on other fronts as well,” says dealer James Lally.
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NYT Piece Charts Current Challenges in Art Economy

September 19th, 2018

Saatchi Gallery, via NYTWriter Olav Velthuis has a piece on the state of the art market this week in The New York Times, noting the challenges and threats posed by the current fair system. “The fairs have existed since the late 1960s, but only in the last two decades have they developed into the market’s potentate,” he says. “Almost half of all gallery sales are nowadays conducted at the fairs, up 16 percentage points from 2010. Gallery owners on average participate in five fairs a year. Not because they like them so much as because they have to.”
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2019 Armory Show Names Curators

September 19th, 2018

Armory Show, via Armory ShowSally Tallant, director of the Liverpool Biennial; Lauren Haynes, curator of contemporary art at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas; and Dan Byers, director of the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have all been selected to curate sections of the 2019 Armory Show, Art News reports. “Curators often have their finger on the pulse,” Director Nicole Berry says. “They can provide new and exciting works that challenge the viewers that they might not see at other fairsIt is important to us to have art on view that isn’t being seen elsewhere. We want to have that sense of discovery—something special and interesting.”
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Artist Geta Brătescu has Died at 92

September 19th, 2018

Geta Bratescu, via Art NewsArtist Geta Brătescu has died at 92, according to gallery Hauser & Wirth.  “Geta Brătescu was a true artist who even in the darkest times maintained her sense of playfulness and freedom,” Iwan Wirth, the cofounder and president of the gallery, said in a statement. “Her powerful life force went in so many directions, from drawing and graphics and photography, to animated videos and tapestry, that even in her 90s she embodied the spirit and passion of a young person. That Geta lived to see her art embraced so enthusiastically on the international level at the 2017 Venice Biennale and at her first New York solo exhibition at our gallery last year, means so much. She will be dearly missed.”
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Nazi-Looted Renoir Returned to Heir of Original Owner

September 19th, 2018

Renoir returned to Sylvia Sulitzer, via Art NewspaperA Nazi-looted Renoir was officially returned this week to the sole heir of the art collector from whom it was stolen, Art Newspaper reports. “Nobody told me about the painting,” says Sylvie Sulitzer, who received the work. “We never talked about the war at home. It was taboo.”
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David Zwirner Takes on Representation of Diane Arbus Estate with Fraenkel Gallery

September 19th, 2018

Diane Arbus, via Art NewsThe estate of Diane Arbus will now share representation Fraenkel Gallery and David Zwirner, Art News reports. “I am honored to have been entrusted to help the Estate and Fraenkel Gallery with the extraordinary legacy of Diane Arbus, whose radical work remains as relevant today as when her photographs were taken,” Zwirner says. “The Estate and Fraenkel Gallery’s handling of Arbus’s work has been exemplary and we are thrilled to partner with them.”
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White Cube to Represent Al Held Estate

September 19th, 2018

Al Held, via Art NewsWhite Cube will now represent the Al Held Foundation, Art News reports. “Looking at his abstract paintings today, you can see that he was way ahead of his time, and as such, his work speaks to a number of contemporary practitioners of abstraction,” John Good, the gallery’s director of artist estates, said in a statement. 
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

New York – Ellen Berkenblit: The Clock Unlocked at Anton Kern Through October 20th, 2018

September 19th, 2018

Ellen Berkenblit, Untitled (2018), via Anton Kern
Ellen Berkenblit, Untitled (2018), via Anton Kern

The Clock Unlocked is the first exhibition to spanning over four decades in the life and work of New York painter Ellen Berkenblit, on now at Anton Kern.  Running through a range of expressive and often enigmatic arrangements, the exhibition presents a roving and exploratory walk through Berkenblit’s practice, tracing evolutions and ongoing interests through any number of touchstones and points of entry.  Arranged instinctually and without chronology, The Clock Unlocked is just that, a diary of paintings and drawings reveals the artist’s idiosyncratic ‘alphabet’— the core of her visual language presented in the same idiosyncratic attitude towards time and space. Read More »

New York – Intimate Infinite: “Imagine A Journey” Curated by Brett Gorvy at Lévy Gorvy Through October 24th, 2018

September 14th, 2018

Cy Twombly, Untitled (1967), via Levy Gorvy
Cy Twombly, Untitled (1967), via Levy Gorvy

If you follow Brett Gorvy on Instagram, it’s immediately apparent that the Lévy Gorvy partner is a master of narrative, spinning long, anecdotal tomes around the images and artworks that he posts in his feed.  Gorvy’s vision and passion for art, and for the stories that surround each of the works that passes through his lens, is almost unparalleled anywhere in the art world, and his move in the past few years towards a gallery position should come as no surprise.  Yet Gorvy has plenty more tricks up his sleeve, and his most recent venture, a curated exhibition at his gallery, showcases just how deep his care and skill towards his profession go. Read More »

New York – Anthony Pearson at Marianne Boesky Through October 20th, 2018

September 12th, 2018

Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Embedment) (2018), via Marianne Boesky
Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Embedment) (2018), via Marianne Boesky

Marking the first show of the fall season at Marianne Boesky’s Chelsea exhibition space, artist Anthony Pearson returns to his long-running experimentations with hydrocal for a new selection of  works.  The artist’s work as a lingering, enigmatic engagement with this material functions as an explicit practice in deep intellectual and physical engagement with a few materials, exploring the behaviors, reactions, and open possibilities of his intentionally limited material vocabulary. 

Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Embedment) (2018), via Marianne Boesky
Anthony Pearson, Untitled (Embedment) (2018), via Marianne Boesky

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New York – Alberto Giacometti at Guggenheim Museum Through September 12th, 2018

September 10th, 2018

Giacometti (Installation view), via Art Observed
Giacometti (Installation view), via Art Observed

White, for Alberto Giacometti, is presented as something of an etheric form, the color of death or absence playing on is interrelation with temporal action.  Space is generated only from the presence of space, and not from its reciprocal orientation. His practice is disposed towards the ideal void, where reality, untouched, is always waiting to be discovered. Giacometti’s opposition to easily read concepts of reality lies in his belief that merely representing figures alone, leaving behind the density and materiality of their  surroundings and ignoring the distance between himself and the object of his perception, offered an incomplete picture of the truth. Giacometti’s eye was profoundly sensitive to different kinds of empty, negative space. He wanted to give form to space, opening his figure from within to its presence or surroundings. Read More »

New York – Charline von Heyl: “New Work” at Petzel Gallery Through October 20th, 2018

September 8th, 2018

Charline von Heyl, New Work (Installation View), via Art Observed
Charline von Heyl, New Work (Installation View), via Art Observed

Few artists possess the sort of free-ranging, exploratory style and vocabulary that seems to mark the output of artist Charline von Heyl.  The German-born painter’s work is relentlessly committed to the canvas as a space for both formal reinvention and ongoing investigation.  Moving through a new selection of works this fall at Petzel Gallery, von Heyl returns to this mode, presenting a series of new compositions that marks her continued interest in texture and space as formative modes of the painter’s internal language.   Read More »

New York – Marguerite Humeau: “Birth Canal” at the New Museum Through January 6th, 2019

September 6th, 2018

Marguerite Humeau, Birth Canal (Installation View), via Adelaide Pacton for Art Observed
Marguerite Humeau, Birth Canal (Installation View), via Adelaide Pacton for Art Observed

Marking a new chapter in a body of work that has long mined the strange juxtapositions of history, culture, form and space, artist Marguerite Humeau has touched down at the New Museum this month, opening a show of works that will remain on view throughout the fall season.  The show, titled Birth Canal, presents a new body of digitally rendered sculptures realized in cast bronze and carved stone, each proposing its own unique vision of how to think through the understanding of the body and it relation to modernity.   Read More »

London – Harold Ancart: “Freeze” at David Zwirner Through September 22nd, 2018

September 5th, 2018

Harold Ancart, Untitled (2018), via David Zwirner
Harold Ancart, Untitled (2018), via David Zwirner

Over the past few years, Belgian-born, New York-based painter Harold Ancart has remained one of the more unique voices in modern painting.  The artist’s deceptively simple, ragged style of painting and his intuitive interpretations of natural phenomena and iconographies have seen his work move through a broad range of styles and iterations, including massive depictions of flames, icebergs and lush forests, always offset by a sense of spatially-sound minimalism.  Captivating in their spare, exploratory style, the artist’s works are a fascinating look at the language of modern practice, and how historical touchstones can double back on themselves to create new structures and vocabularies.  Read More »

New York – “Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan” at MOMA PS1 Through September 3rd, 2018

September 1st, 2018

Li Binyuan at MoMA PS1, via Sophie Kitching for Art Observed
Li Binyuan at MoMA PS1, via Sophie Kitching for Art Observed

Exploring shared conceptual space between two generations of Chinese performance artists, MoMA PS1’s Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan is a highlight of its summer calendar.  The exhibition, which draws on each artist’s unique approach to the body, particularly bodies exposed to physical or mental extremes, as well as the forces applied to it, from urbanization to culture to the natural world, presents itself as a documentation of sorts, relying heavily on each artist’s history of performance and video.   Read More »

Berlin – Senga Nengudi at Sprüth Magers Through September 8th, 2018

August 29th, 2018

Senga Nengudi, RSVP Reverie D (2014), via Sprüth Magers
Senga Nengudi, RSVP Reverie D (2014), via Sprüth Magers

For over four decades, artist Senga Nengudi has been pushing at the boundaries between sculpture, photography, and performance. A member of the African American avant-garde in Los Angeles and New York during the 1970s and 1980s, Nengudi began her career with innovative sculptures and performances, staged within art spaces and beyond gallery walls, that expanded the definition of sculpture, while simultaneously drawing on performance art’s ephemeral capabilities to investigate and question.  For Nengudi, this mode worked well to examine and seek to define women’s delimited roles in contemporary culture. Marking her first solo exhibition in Germany, the artist”s current exhibition at Sprüth Magers is a concise and powerful summary of her work at a time of significant debates worldwide over power and identity. Read More »

New York – David Wojnarowicz: “History Keeps Me Awake at Night” at the Whitney Museum Through September 30th, 2018

August 27th, 2018

David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (Americans Can't Deal with Death) (1990), via Art Observed
David Wojnarowicz, Americans Can’t Deal with Death (1990), via Art Observed

Few artists have managed to fly so consistently under the microscope of the art world’s fascination with downtown New York in the way that David Wojnarowicz has for so many years. Beginning in the late 1970s, the artist created a body of work that spanned photography, painting, music, film, sculpture, writing, and activism. Largely self-taught, he came to prominence in New York in the 1980s, a period marked by creative energy, financial precariousness, and profound cultural changes, yet his body of work has long been held off from the more hallmark names of the era in terms of impact and historical resonance.  This month, The Whitney seeks to remedy this situation, granting the artist his first major museum retrospective, and turning its focus on a body of work that has long shone brightly even away from the limelight. Read More »