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Market Thrives for Kerry James Marshall

June 19th, 2018

Kerry James Marshall, via NPRThe Art Newspaper looks at the thriving popularity of the work of Kerry James Marshall, after a record-breaking auction price drove new interest in his work, and a rampant demand for pieces, including those about to go on view at a show at David Zwirner’s London location. “We might not even keep a waiting list for the exhibition,” Zwirner says. “It’s going to be very hard to get a painting from that show, that’s for sure.”
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Theaster Gates Asks Collectors: “Support Artists That Live in Your Cities”

June 19th, 2018

Theaster Gates, via The GuardianTheaster Gates made a statement on supporting young artists in remarks last night at a party in Basel, asking collectors to support young artists making and selling their work. “You guys, I know that I’m the byproduct of people saying yes when they didn’t know me, saying yes at my potential and the possibility of the thing,” he said. “Throwing small dinners with me with five people that has turned into dinners for 200. I’m just grateful.”
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Art Newspaper Looks at Costs and Rewards of Major Art Prizes

June 19th, 2018

Glasgow-born artist Susan Philipsz is congratulated by friends and family after hearing that she has won the Turner Prize 2010, at the Tate Britain gallery, in central LondonA piece in Art Newspaper this week asks if arts awards really carry many of the benefits for winners that they claim, looking at a range of examples including a recent protest by a group of artists nominated for Germany’s Berlin Nationalgalerie Prize. “There is an unspoken assumption that the participants are likely to be remunerated by the market as a result of being nominated for or winning the prize,” the artists nominated for this prize said in an open statement. “We know that this is not always the case. The logic of artists working for exposure feeds directly into the normalization of the unregulated pay structures ubiquitous in the art field.”
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Alexander Calder

Image via Britannica
1898 – 1976
Represented by:

Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Tomasi Gallery, New York

Lives and works in:

Roxbury, CT

Education includes:

Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey
Art Students League of New York, New York

Calder, one of America’s most famous sculptors, was responsible for the invention of the mobile. His most well known work features perfectly balanced mobiles comprised of floating shapes in flat, bright colors hanging delicately by wire. They twist and turn, magically hovering in air, while spreading out from a central wire.

The Star, (1960) via UK
A versatile artist, he created lithographs, toys, paintings, tapestry and designed carpets. He was born the son of sculptor Alexander Stirling Calder, and began making sculptures of his own at a young age. After attending New York’s Art Students League and taking a job as a sketch artist for the National Police Gazette, he moved to Paris at the age of 26 and opened his own studio. Shortly after, having been urged by fellow sculptor Jose De Creeft and influenced Serbian toy merchants, he took to creating toys, developing his own series called Circque Calder, a combination of wire sculpture and kinetic art that resembled a miniature circus and which is currently on display at the Whitney Museum.

Eagle, (1971) via About

In 1927, he returned to the United States still fascinated with toys. He continued creating and the following year, he held his first solo exhibit at New York’s Weyhe Gallery, showcasing the wooden push and pull children’s toys he had created. In 1929, he expanded on the wire stylings behind Circque and exhibited his wire sculptures in Paris at Galerie Billiet. The 1930s saw him continue to put on his Circque Calder shows as well as experiment with knew, self-supporting structures called “stabiles.” His first retrospective was held in 1938 at the George Walter Vincent Smith Gallery in Springfield, Massachusetts.

In the 1950s, he began to focus on monumental sculptures, many of which would become his most famous works. He created monumental pieces for JFK airport in 1957 and UNESCO in Paris in 1958. His largest piece, “El Sol Rojo” which was 20.5 meters tall, was created for the Mexico City Olympics of 1968. Many large stabiles found home in major American cities, like “Flamingo” which was placed in Chicago’s Federal Plaza and “WTC Stabile” which stood outside 7 World Trade Center when it was collapsed on September 11, 2001.

WTC Stabile (Bent Propeller), (1971) via Public Art at the WTC

He was also commissioned by Braniff International Airways in the 1973 and 1975 to create two large-scale paintings of airplanes and was creating a third when he died in 1976. The following year, President Gerald Ford posthumously awarded him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States’ highest civilian honor. Permanent exhibitions of his work can be viewed at the Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, New York, New York City’s Whitney Musuem of American Art, The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. as well as the Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna, Palazzo Collicola located in Spoleto, Italy.

Emerging Globes (1971) via Beth Urdang Gallery

External Links

Wikipedia Entry