Global contemporary art events and news observed from New York City. Suggestion? Email us.

Camille Henrot’s Ventures Into Fashion Profiled in Vogue

March 15th, 2018

Camille Henrot, via VogueVogue profiles artist Camille Henrot’s recent ventures into fashion with a series of clothes and scarves she designed for the Swiss Institute booth at Independent NY last week.  “What was so special and fascinating about working on scarves was that I was thinking of the drawings as seen from multiple dimensions on the body—wrapping around a person but also folding onto itself—and how the wearer would make the drawing evolve,” she says.
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Julian Schnabel Interviewed in NYT

March 15th, 2018

Julian Schnabel at Legion of Honor, via NYTJulian Schnabel is interviewed in the New York Times this week, as he prepares a show at San Francisco’s Legion of Honor, and reflects on his shared view of painting and surfing. “It’s like paddling out in big surf. There’s a wall there, and you are a certain size and the sea is a certain size and these paintings are a certain size,” he says. “It happens so quickly you just want to relive that and be in that sensation again. Painting for me is like that. The joy of just doing it and being lost in the experience of that is compelling to me.”
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Münster Raising Money to Purchase Beloved Nicole Eisenman Sculpture

March 15th, 2018

Nicole Eisenman, Sketch for a Fountain (2017). Photo: Henning RoggeA group of Münster residents are working to raise €1.2 million to buy artist Nicole Eisenman’s Sketch for a Fountain, which was installed this summer for the city’s Sculpture Projects Münster. “The work is a very political statement and we want to make a stand for tolerance and respect,” artist Sylvia Silbernagel says of the work. “We are trying to win over local businesses as ambassadors.”
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Donald Judd

1928 – 1994
Represented by:

Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Lives and works in:

New York, NY and Marfa, TX

Education includes:

Columbia University BA, New York

Judd is well- known American sculptor. Using industrial materials and processes that make invisible all traces of the artist’s hand, Judd is a leading figure of minimalism. Minimalists were, in part, reacting to the prevalent movement of abstract expressionism happening post World War II. Jackson Pollock and his freedom-signifying heroic male drips that reduced painting to a purely optical experience provoked a counter movement in minimalism that invoked strategies of the historical avant garde, such as the ready-made and industrial, non-art materials. Drawn to humble materials with no pretension, Judd’s sculptures were made of several, identical, completely smooth cubes or bricks made from metal, concrete or plexiglass. They are arranged in space, not touching, in a way that prevents any compositional hierarchy from developing. He called them freestanding “specific objects”. These repetitive forms posits the viewer and the art object and the space around it as all interacting forces that form an art experience. His work also made each viewer the same, anyone with eyes could potentially share the same experience with his work. His first solo show was in 1957 in New York at the Panoras gallery. The Whitney Museum of American Art held a retrospective of his life’s work in 1968 which included early paintings alongside his sculptures. The same year, he purchased a 5-story building in New York to display his works in a more permanent setting. His building further led him to distance himself from temporary, curator-designed public exhibitions which he felt distanced the artist from his or her work. In the 1970s, the scale of his work grew even larger and he created several room-sized installations. Aided by the Dia Art Foundation, he purchased 340 acres of land in 1979 in Marfa, Texas which included an abandoned Army fort. Starting in 1986, this site would be home to the Chinati Foundation, a non-profit art foundation that now houses the art of Judd and several of his contemporaries. He died of lymphoma in 1994. In 2006, the Judd Foundation, who has assumed responsibility of maintaining his large properties and the corresponding installations, auctioned 35 of his sculptures at Christie’s in New York. The auction raised $25 million which will be used toward sustain the installations located in Marfa, Texas and New York City’s 101 Spring St.