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Jerry Saltz Triumphs Over TriBeCa’s Art World Ascendance

September 18th, 2019

Jerry Saltz pens a piece in NY Mag this week trumpeting the return of the TriBeCa art scene, as a range of galleries open in the neighborhood. “Against all odds, can New York have a good art neighborhood with a walkable density of galleries?” He asks.  “Galleries with wooden floors, flaws, and funny footprints, which are more like where artists actually make art than all those perfect, concrete-floored slick showrooms?”
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Whitney Breaks Ground on Monumental David Hammons Sculpture

September 18th, 2019

The Whitney has broken ground on David Hammons’s Day’s End (2020), a permanent install across from the museum in the southern edge of Gansevoort Peninsula.  The piece is referred to by the artist as a “ghost monument” to Gordon Matta-Clark’s 1975 work of the same name in the same location.
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Ragnar Kjartansson Interviewed on Making ‘The Visitors’

September 18th, 2019

The Guardian’s running series of highlights of 21st Century arts features Ragnar Kjartansson’s The Visitors, calling it the best artwork of the 21st Century so far.  “It has a special place in my heart, but it was such a feelgood piece that I had to make some really dark shit afterwards,” he says of his work. “No artist has a favorite piece. Maybe you can pick one when you’re really old – but it’s something I’m super proud of. It took on a life of its own.”
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Doug Aitken

Doug Aitken

image via AFP/Getty Images

b.1968

Lives/Works in:

Los Angeles, California

Education:

Marymount College, Palos Verdes, CA [1987–1991]

Art Center College of Design, Pasadena

Aitken’s style of art lingers in a realm between popular culture and media art. He has taken the liberty of incorporating video into much of his work, revealing a wealth of intensities. “There is no linear narrative in Aitken’s videos; the story line is disjointed both in terms of the films’ structure and sequence of images, as well as in their prism-like projection.” Grosenick, pg.20

Atkins is not only a videographer, but a photographer as well. He creates photographs influenced by epic road movies, as well as photographs manipulated through the use of a computer.  Atkins’ photographs “kaleidoscopically fragment their motifs, thus attempting to translate the principle of his video projections into a single flat surface.” Grosenick, pg. 20

“He belongs to a generation of artist that enriched the presentation of the medium of video. Aitken’s work questions nature and civilization as well as people and their relationship to time and space. Obsessed with the idea of present time, Aitken refers to his films and installations as being pure communication. In the process, he utilizes the vocabulary of Hollywood and advertising films. Alongside his freelance activities as artist and photographer, Doug Aitken is also known for his video clips, completed for artists such as Iggy Pop and Fatboy Slim.” -Media Art Net

Doug Aitken

Electric Earth image via Media Art Net

Aitken is currently participating in the Life on Mars exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Migration

Migration, image via Carnegie Museum of Art

Grosenick, Uta. Art Now Vol.2. Los Angeles: Taschen, 2005.***********

Wikipedia Entry

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