Global contemporary art events and news observed from New York City. Suggestion? Email us.
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LaToya Ruby Frazier Featured in NYT

March 3rd, 2021

LaToya Ruby Frazier has a piece in the NYT this week, showcasing new work and talking about her critical approach towards American culture. “I am showing these dark things about America because I love my country and countrymen,” she says. “When you love somebody, you tell them the truth. Even if it hurts.”
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MoMA Covers Architect Philip Johnson’s Name from Wall Signage Over Fascist Views

March 3rd, 2021

MoMA has covered up the name of late architect Philip Johnson on wall signs amid allegations of his fascist views. “To move forward with the exhibition thoughtfully, honoring the communities that the artists and their works represent, we feel it’s appropriate to respect the exhibition design suggestion and cover the signage with Johnson’s name outside the Architecture and Design galleries on an interim basis,” a MoMA spokesperson said. “To confront this matter, the Museum currently has underway a rigorous research initiative to explore in full the allegations against Johnson and gather all available information. This work is ongoing.”
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Italy Looks to Art to Help Combat Overtourism

March 3rd, 2021

Italy is looking to combat its crush of tourists in major cities by leasing works from the Uffizi in Florence to smaller museums and spaces around the country, CNN reports. “We already have over 3,000 works of art on display in the Uffizi — that’s enough,” Uffizi director Eike Schmidt says.
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Edgar Degas

Dancing Examination, (1874) via ExpoDegas

b. July 19, 1834 in Paris, France
d. september 27, 1917 in Paris France

Schools
Lycee Lious-le-Grand
Ecole des Beaux-Arts 

Edgar Degas is considered an Impressionists artist. He is considered one of the founders of Impressionist art by some though his style crossed many artistic boundaries. His paintings, pastels, drawings and sculptures showed his skilled draftsmanship. 

L’Absinthe (1875-6) via Tate

Degas’s subjects changed throughout his career. He started painting historical paintings and reproductions of grand masters to contemporary life.  He captured horses at the race track, and women at work. But his focus would soon turn to dancers backstage or in rehearsals.  

Little Dancer of Fourteen Years, was probably his most controversial piece, as some saw it as hideous and while others its potential. 

Little Dancer of Fourteen Years, (1880-1881) via the Clark

Towards the end of his life, Degas became blind, and turned to sculpting. He created many horse sculptures capture their movement as well as his ballerina and women bathing.