Global contemporary art events and news observed from New York City. Suggestion? Email us.

ICA Philadelphia Gets W.A.G.E. Certification

March 23rd, 2018

ICA Philly, via Art NewsThe ICA Philadelphia will be the first museum certified by Working Artists and the Greater Economy (W.A.G.E.), a New York-based organization pushing for sustainable economic relationships between artists and exhibiting institutions. “Our partnership with W.A.G.E. helps to set a new standard in the museum field, one that ensures equitable environments for the artists with whom we work,” director, Amy Sadao, said in a statement.“We’re proud to be the first museum to join this diverse group of arts and culture institutions across the U.S. who are certified, and hope that it will encourage other museums to do the same.”
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Art News Explores Controversy Over Helen Molesworth Firing

March 22nd, 2018

Helen Molesworth, via MOCAArt News has a piece exploring the firing of Helen Molesworth at MOCA in-depth, seeking to understand what the museum’s claims that she had been “undermining the museum.” The piece explores a series of public statements and quotes by the curator that were critical of MOCA and its programming choices.  “Everything that happens in museums is a microcosm of what happens in the world,” she says in one quote.  “I’ve been told that I have lot of ‘swagger’—code: gay, code: black. I have been told: Do I have to look at everything through the lens of identity politics?”
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Joan Jonas Profiled in The Guardian

March 22nd, 2018

Joan Jonas, via GuardianJoan Jonas gets a feature in The Guardian this week, as the artist opens her retrospective at the Tate Modern. “When I use a myth or a story or a literary text in my work, I often extract particular passages from a larger narrative that resonates with me,” she says. “In performance, the audience hears the text, recorded in advance or recited in real time, in fragments, and sees components – such as movements, props, drawings and video – that may relate only indirectly to the text. I don’t change the language, but rather I change the context, which opens up the text to different possibilities of meaning. I don’t illustrate; I juxtapose.”
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Eric Fischl

Birthdate: 1948
Born in: New York City

Education includes:

Phoenix College
Arizona State University California
Institute of the Arts in Valencia, California, where he earned his BFA in 1972.
He then moved to job as a guard at the Museum of Contemporary Art

Work :

* Fischl has embraced the description of himself as a painter of the suburbs, not generally considered appropriate subject matter prior to his generation. Some of Fischl’s earlier works have a theme of adolescent sexuality and voyeurism, such as Sleepwalker (1979) Bad Boy (1981) and Birthday Boy (1983) both depict young boys looking at older women shown in provocative poses on a bed. In 2002, Fischl collaborated with the Museum Haus Esters in Krefeld, Germany. Haus Esters is a 1928 home, designed by Mies van der Rohe in 1928 to be a private home. It now houses changing exhibitions.

Fischl refurnished it as a home (though not particularly in Bauhaus style, and hired models who, for several days, pretended to be a couple who lived there. He took 2,000 photographs, which he reworked digitally and used as the basis for a series of paintings, one of which, the monumental Krefeld Project, Bedroom #6 (Surviving the Fall Meant Using You for Handholds) (2004) was purchased by Paul Allen featured in the 2006 Double Take Exhibit at Experience Music Project, where it was juxtaposed with a much smaller Degas pastel. This is by no means the first time Fischl has been compared to Degas. Twenty years earlier, reviewing a show of 28 Fischl paintings at New York’s Whitney Museum, John Russell wrote in the New York Times, “Degas sets up a charged situation with his incomparable subtlety of insight and characterization, and then he goes away and leaves us to figure it out as best we can. That is the tactic of Fischl, too, though the society with which he deals has an unstructured brutality and a violence never far from release that are very different from the nicely calibrated cruelties that Degas recorded.”

* via Wikipedia