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KAWS Launches Exhibition in Fortnite Video Game

January 18th, 2022

KAWS is launching an online exhibition in the video game Fortnite, as well as one at London’s Serpentine Gallery. “Being able to create works,” the artist says, “and the version that I’m viewing in Brooklyn is the version you could be viewing in India, I just started to get really obsessed with the opportunities within that.”

Read more at The Guardian

Pissarro Work, Formerly Nazi Loot, Heads to US Supreme Court

January 17th, 2022

A Camille Pissarro work looted by the Nazis will head to US Supreme Court to hear a case over its ownership, as the descendants of Lilly Cassirer Neubauer sue for the painting’s return. “This has been three generations of the Cassirer family trying to take back what is theirs,” says attorney Stephen Zack of the US law firm Boies Schiller Flexner.

Read More at The Guardian

Jewish Museum Employees Vote to Unionize

January 17th, 2022

Employees at the Jewish Museum in New York have voted to unionize. “The Jewish Museum is aware that staff have petitioned for a union election,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “The Museum greatly values its staff and will respectfully engage in any process that transpires.”

Read more at Art Newspaper

REFERENCE LIBRARY

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, image via National Galleries

b. 1909 in Dublin, died 1992 in Madrid

Bacon was considered a modern artist but did not belong to any particular art movement. He developed his own style of work, often creating scenes involving violence or sexuality.

Bacon is an Irish born painter, who is best known for his nightmarish, grotesque imagery.  He lived a tumulus life, constantly moving, being shuffled around to relatives, a strained relationship with his father, menial jobs, and a severe case of asthma and a violent allergy to dogs and horses.  He was never formally trained or attended any art schools.  

His medical conditions caused him to purchase a medical book on the subject matter diseases of the mouth, which contained images that would haunt him for the rest of his life. Bacon noted that the 1925 silent film The Battleship Potemkin, was highly influential on his work.

His first show was in 1929, which exhibited his rugs and furniture he had created while working as an interior designer.  His later works were an abstraction of the human form. 


Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) via Tate Collection

Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) would be the first forerunner of Bacon’s works that would take the triptych format.   Three panels placed behind heavily gilded frames, an open mouth a reference to the The Battleship Potemkin, and the use of distortion.  

Study after Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent

Study After Velazquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent image via Art Quotes

Bacon also became interested in Diego Velasquez’s work, particularly, his Portrait of Pope Innocent X, 1650. Bacon painted a series of Popes, however his version the Pope was more gruesome and nightmarish.


Triptych (1972) via Tate Collection

Bacon destroyed his previous works he did not deem worthy, many ending up with slashed canvases. His relationship with Eastender George Dyer influenced his Triptych (1973), which documents Dyer’s suicide, and would continue to be a theme for his works for the rest of his life. 

Bacon died of a heart attack April 28, 1992 while in Madrid, Spain.