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Jeffrey Deitch Featured on “Artbound”

June 17th, 2019

Jeffrey Deitch gets a profile in KCET’s Artbound program, spotlighting his recent work, his focus on Los Angeles’s thriving arts scene, and his early days expanding the scope of the contemporary art market.  “Some people say I created a monster because we basically invented the profession of professional art advisory,” Deitch says of his early work.
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CNN Speculates on Location of “Salvator Mundi” Painting

June 17th, 2019

CNN takes a look at the disappearance of Salvator Mundi after its landmark sale last year, noting that the work hasn’t been seen in public since its landmark sale.  “It’s either on the yacht or in a Geneva lock-up, and I’m slowly coming to the conclusion that the yacht is really quite plausible,” writer Ben Lewis said in a phone interview, alluding to speculation that the work is on a luxury yacht belonging to Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman. “But I would suggest that it may not be the safest environment in which to hang up this picture.”
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Sterling Ruby’s New Fashion Line Profiled in NYT

June 17th, 2019

Sterling Ruby’s new fashion line gets a profile in the NYT this week, as the artist and budding designer traces his experiences with fiber arts and clothing.   “Outside of the logistics of putting together the collection and the garments — in the kind of production of it — I don’t see it as any different to making a sculpture or a painting,” he says.
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, image via National Galleries

b. 1909 in Dublin, died 1992 in Madrid

Bacon was considered a modern artist but did not belong to any particular art movement. He developed his own style of work, often creating scenes involving violence or sexuality.

Bacon is an Irish born painter, who is best known for his nightmarish, grotesque imagery.  He lived a tumulus life, constantly moving, being shuffled around to relatives, a strained relationship with his father, menial jobs, and a severe case of asthma and a violent allergy to dogs and horses.  He was never formally trained or attended any art schools.  

His medical conditions caused him to purchase a medical book on the subject matter diseases of the mouth, which contained images that would haunt him for the rest of his life. Bacon noted that the 1925 silent film The Battleship Potemkin, was highly influential on his work.

His first show was in 1929, which exhibited his rugs and furniture he had created while working as an interior designer.  His later works were an abstraction of the human form. 


Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) via Tate Collection

Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) would be the first forerunner of Bacon’s works that would take the triptych format.   Three panels placed behind heavily gilded frames, an open mouth a reference to the The Battleship Potemkin, and the use of distortion.  

Study after Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent

Study After Velazquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent image via Art Quotes

Bacon also became interested in Diego Velasquez’s work, particularly, his Portrait of Pope Innocent X, 1650. Bacon painted a series of Popes, however his version the Pope was more gruesome and nightmarish.


Triptych (1972) via Tate Collection

Bacon destroyed his previous works he did not deem worthy, many ending up with slashed canvases. His relationship with Eastender George Dyer influenced his Triptych (1973), which documents Dyer’s suicide, and would continue to be a theme for his works for the rest of his life. 

Bacon died of a heart attack April 28, 1992 while in Madrid, Spain.