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RIP: Vito Acconci Has Passed Away at the Age of 77

April 28th, 2017

Vito Acconi, via huffington post
Vito Acconi, via Huffington Post

Vito Acconci, the groundbreaking artist, architect and performer whose impact on the field of contemporary art counts among the most influential of the 20th Century, has passed away at the age of 77.  Acconci suffered a stroke this week, from which he did not recover.


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Marciano Art Foundation Prepares to Open in LA

April 28th, 2017

Marciano Art Foundation, via LA MagazineLA Magazine profiles the soon to open Marciano Art Foundation on Wilshire, and the long-running efforts to open the converted Masonic Temple. “I wanted to have a place not just to exhibit art but rather for the artists to come and get inspired and do whatever they want. We’ll just let things happen,” says Maurice Marciano.
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Art Newspaper Examines Art Policies of French Presidential Candidates

April 28th, 2017

Le Pen and Macron, via Art NewspaperThe Art Newspaper profiles the contrasting policies towards the arts of French presidential candidates Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen, who are set for a run-off on May 7th.  Macron is pushing to maintain the arts budget, and will embrace EU-centered policies, while Le Pen’s staunch isolationism sees her pushing for increased funds for conservation and a halt to the sale of buildings to foreigners. 
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Richard Serra

b. 1939
Lives and works in:

New York state and Nova Scotia

Represented by:

Gagosian Gallery, New York

Education includes:

University of California BA, Santa Barbara
Yale BFA, New Haven, CT
Yale CFA, New Haven, CT

Serra is a sculptor most well known for his gargantuan, site-specific steel sculptures that completely envelope their viewers. These sculptures are comprised of carefully arranged walls gently curving on two axes with space in between for people to walk within the looming rusted passageways. He is often cited as a minimalist, as his work emphasizes materiality and engagement between viewer, site and the work. Serra is known for his avid devotion and development of the notion of process art. All of these intentions, place him in the category of the neo- avant- garde, as defined by Burger.

Serra’s career was jump-started by his Splash series (1968-1970). He dripped and splashed molten lead on the juncture between the wall and the floor. This work was a crucial moment in art history for the site specific artwork, while simultaneously drawing on Jackson Pollock’s emphasis on process and the use of industrial materials in 20th century Russian avant garde works.

Serra’s work became embroiled in controversy, when a commissioned large scale, site specific sculpture Tilted Arc (1981) was removed from the Federal Plaza due to public dismay after eight years of battle. Workers in the area complained that the gently curving 3.5 meter tall piece of steel interfered with pedestrian traffic in the square. The city suggested that the piece be moved. Consistent to the tenets of site-specificity, Serra famously retorted, “To remove the work is to destroy it.” The piece was taken down and turned into scrap metal in 1989.

Serra continues to construct the huge steel installations he is now famous for. His first solo show was in the Leo Castelli ware house, Serra continues to show with Castelli as well as Gagosian Gallery. He has exhibited extensively around the world, including at the MOMA, the Guggenheim Bilbao, Kunsthalle Tubingen, and the Musee National d’Art Moderne.

Serra at MOMA June 3- September 10, 2008 [Art Observed]