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New Museum Triennial Curator Lauren Cornell Interviewed in Dazed

April 27th, 2015

Read more at Dazed

“Like-Kind” Exchanges in Art Market Undergoing Tax Scrutiny

April 27th, 2015

Read more at New York Times

 

New Study on Digital Tech in Museums Set for Release this Week

April 27th, 2015

Read more at NYT

Cai Guo-Qiang Profiled in WSJ

April 26th, 2015

Read more at WSJ

MAK Vienna Becomes First Museum to Use Bitcoin as Currency in Purchasing Work

April 26th, 2015

Read more at Art News

 

Behind the Difficulties in Financing Art Projects

April 26th, 2015

Read more at Bloomberg

 

Chris Dercon Leaving Tate Modern for Berlin’s Volksbühne

April 26th, 2015

Read more at The Guardian

Shirin Neshat Profiled in FT

April 25th, 2015

Read more at Financial Times

 

Times Square Billboards to Screen Andy Warhol’s “Screen Tests” This May

April 25th, 2015

Read more at Paper

Printed Matter Moving to Two-Floor Space on Eleventh Ave

April 25th, 2015

Read more at Printed Matter

 

Jasper Johns Studio Thief Sentenced to One Year in Prison

April 25th, 2015

Read more at Reuters

 

Guggenheim Helsinki Designs Go on View Today

April 25th, 2015

Read more at Art Daily

El Anatsui to Receive Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement

April 24th, 2015

Read more at Venice Biennale

Christo Announces Major Project in Italy

April 24th, 2015

Read more Art Newspaper

Institut Giacometti to Open to Public Next Year

April 24th, 2015

Read more at New York Times

New York – Piotr Uklanski: “Fatal Attraction” at The Met Through August 16th, 2015

April 24th, 2015

Uklanski’s aesthetic project makes for an interesting conceptual fold in a period of photography already fascinated with the potentials for the repositioning and reappropriation as challenges to photographic integrity and history.  Cultural signifiers are afforded their own conceptual space, independent of the image itself, often lending a certain distance between the final product and the act of creation.  The skull itself is taken from a classic Dali image, but is altered with the presence of a male body, notably in a central position of dominance that reinserts a certain instability to the work.  Placing gender power structures in the work itself, Uklanski makes a subtle mockery of Dali’s sexualization of death, while underlining the Spanish artist’s presence in the generation of the work.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (GTXa) (2001), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (GTXa) (2001), via Art Observed

Elsewhere, Uklanski shows a more material fascination with the composition and capturing of the photographic image.  In one particularly compelling work, notable despite its small size, the artist renders a speed blur on a palm tree blowing in the wind.  The introduction of a violent forward motion to the work surface bears striking resemblance to the imagery of a scorched photograph, underlining a sense of destruction tied to the work’s execution.  In another, Uklanski creates a dizzying swirl from the act of exposure during film development.  Presenting a iridescent pool of colors, the work places the act of creation as image itself, the alluring material elements that enable the image’s existence.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Joannes Paulus PP II Karol Wojtyla) (2004), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Joannes Paulus PP II Karol Wojtyla) (2004), via Art Observed

The exhibition also features some of Uklanski’s exercises in accumulated images as a photographic archive, including a massive wall covered with photographs of various cultural depictions of Nazi’s, from press images to cartoons and propaganda posters.  The piece, exploring the variation in context and implication present in media depictions of “evil” forces, is a strange, yet occasionally chilling work, especially when examining characters that very nearly carry a cartoonish appeal.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Vesuvius) (2000), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Vesuvius) (2000), via Art Observed

The exhibition is also accompanied by another exhibition at the museum, showcasing a range of figurative selections from across the Met’s broad collection of holdings, curated by Uklanski himself.  Ranging from early Egyptian jasper carvings to contemporary photographs, the artist’s work here investigates the continued presence of both the erotic and the deadly throughout the range of artistic history.

Piotr Uklanski: Fatal Attraction, is on view through August 16th.  His exhibition of works from the museum collection closes on June 14th.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Coconut Tree) (1998), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Coconut Tree) (1998), via Art Observed

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Story of the Eye) (2013), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Story of the Eye) (2013), via Art Observed

— D. Creahan

Read more:
Piotr Uklanski: Fatal Attraction [Exhibition Site]
“Review: In ‘Fatal Attraction,’ Piotr Uklanski’s Unblinking Gaze” [NYT]

The Telegraph Goes Inside the Trends towards Art Collection and Exhibition as Status Symbols

April 23rd, 2015

Read more at The Telegraph

Armenian Pavilion to Commemorate 100 Years Since WWI Massacre

April 23rd, 2015

Read more at Art Newspaper

New York Times Looks at the Soon to be Completed Prada Foundation Complex in Milan

April 23rd, 2015

Read more at New York Times

 

Art Institute of Chicago Receives Landmark $400 Million Gift

April 22nd, 2015

Read more at Chicago Tribune

 

Early Reviews Praise New Whitney Museum

April 22nd, 2015

Read the articles below:
“New York Odyssey” [New Yorker]
“The New New Museum: How the Whitney might just solve the impossible problem of contemporary art” [New York Magazine]

Robert Rauschenberg Foundation No Longer Represented by Gagosian

April 22nd, 2015

Read more at Artforum

LACMA Announces $200 Million in Donations for 50th Anniversary Exhibition

April 22nd, 2015

Read more at New York Times

Alfred Taubman, Former Sotheby’s Owner and Philanthropist, Passes Away at 91

April 21st, 2015

Alfred Taubman, Mayor Coleman Young and Max Fisher, via Detroit Free Press

Taubman is also remembered for his generous philanthropy, including multimillion dollar donations to the University of Michigan.  “Aside from his support, which was substantial, I never stopped marveling at his energy and his concern that others might live a better life,” said Paul Anger, editor of the Detroit Free Press. “He never stopped looking for ways to make the community better, to make lives better, to give back.”

Taubman is survived by his wife, Judith Mazor Rounick.

Read more at Detroit Free Press

 

New Museum Triennial Curator Lauren Cornell Interviewed in Dazed

Lauren Cornell, via WLauren Cornell, the Curator of this year’s New Museum Triennial, is interviewed in Dazed this week, reflecting on her origins in experimental film, her work with Rhizome, and her work in addressing gender and sexuality as a curator.  “I think it seems especially hard or frustrating to come up as a young artist now in an art world that seems to think of itself as ‘over’ inequality, while consistently rewarding white men more than anyone else,” she says.  “In this context, it’s important to create spaces for ongoing inequalities to be named and dealt with constructively.”

Read more at Dazed

“Like-Kind” Exchanges in Art Market Undergoing Tax Scrutiny

Mike Kelley, via NYTThe New York Times looks at the current practices of “Like-Kind Exchange” on the fine art market, a tax provision allowing collectors and art flippers to defer taxes on sales income by using proceeds to buy an even more expensive work, and the attention it’s currently receiving from tax regulators.  “If you are doing five transactions over 25 years,” says advisor Josh Baer, “each time buying something more expensive, each time you don’t pay the capital gains tax on the way. At the end of the day you are way ahead.”

Read more at New York Times

 

New Study on Digital Tech in Museums Set for Release this Week

Young museum-goers at Worcester Art Museum, via NYTA new study on the use of digital technologies in American art museums is set for release this week, an in-depth study that looks at museum projects nationwide and their effectiveness in incorporating new immersive media.  The study covers 41 museum projects, from a “digital census” of French sculpture at Dallas’s Nasher Center to new iPad based wall labeling at the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts.  

Read more at NYT

Cai Guo-Qiang Profiled in WSJ

Cai Guo-Qiang, via WSJCai Guo-Qiang is interviewed in the Wall Street Journal this week, and gives his personal take on the current state of contemporary art in China.  “Even though the art market is doing better than it did in the 1980s, the artworks that it generates do not have as much soul and strength to their works as the early avant-garde movements [did] in the 1980s,” he says.

Read more at WSJ

MAK Vienna Becomes First Museum to Use Bitcoin as Currency in Purchasing Work

Event Listeners, via Art NewsThe MAK Vienna has purchased artist Harm van den Dorpel’s Event Listeners screen-saver work with Bitcoins, making it the first museum in the world to use the digitally-centered currency.  The work will be shown at this year’s inaugural Vienna Biennale, running June 11 to October 4.Read more at Art News

 

Behind the Difficulties in Financing Art Projects

Alice Aycock, via BloombergBloomberg takes a look at the difficulties behind financing large-scale art projects, including the issues often facing galleries when it comes to selling the completed pieces, focusing the study on artist Alice Aycock’s public installation on Park Ave.  “It’s a long-term financial investment,” says Aycock’s gallerist, Thomas Schulte. “One work by Aycock cost $350,000 alone in production costs, and took over a year to make, and in that particular case we needed another year to sell it.”

Read more at Bloomberg

 

Chris Dercon Leaving Tate Modern for Berlin’s Volksbühne

Chris Dercon, via GuardianTate Modern Director Chris Dercon will leave the museum to head up Berlin’s experimental theatre landmark, the Volksbühne in 2017, The Guardian reports.  “Chris Dercon is helping to open Tate Modern to a wider world and more diverse audiences through his support for a more international programme, photography, live performance and film,” says Tate head Nicolas Serota. “We look forward to working with him on the opening of the new Tate Modern and until he takes up his appointment in Berlin in 2017.”

Read more at The Guardian

Shirin Neshat Profiled in FT

Shirin Neshat, via FTThe Financial Times profiles Iranian artist Shirin Neshat as she prepares to open a career retrospective at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. and Baku, Azerbaijan.  “As an Iranian in exile, she has always been very articulate about the idea of a condition of diaspora and, with that, the complexity of feeling connected to a culture, but living outside it,” says Director Melissa Chiu. “It’s a very personal approach to history, through Shirin’s own eyes.”

Read more at Financial Times

 

Times Square Billboards to Screen Andy Warhol’s “Screen Tests” This May

Edie Sedgwick in a Screen Test, via PaperThe Midnight Moment video art screenings in New York will continue this May, with the showing of Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests on the immense video billboards of Times Square.  The screen tests on view will feature a variety of Factory regulars, including Edie Sedgwick, Susan Sontag and Lou Reed.

Read more at Paper

Printed Matter Moving to Two-Floor Space on Eleventh Ave

The new Printed Matter Space, via Printed MatterPrinted Matter is leaving its current space at 195 Tenth Avenue, which is has occupied for the last 10 years, and moving to a new, two-level space at the corner of Eleventh Avenue and 26th Street this September, the organization announced this week.  The new building will double its current space, and will allow a more diverse series of events to be held on-site.  “Printed Matter’s new location will provide us with the much-needed space to facilitate our many different programs and services,” says Printed Matter Board Chair Philip Aarons. “In the past 10 years we’ve more than doubled in size as an organization, and it has become clear that we have simply out-grown our current space. We are thrilled by the prospects and opportunities our new home will provide in the fulfillment and furthering of our mission.”

Read more at Printed Matter

 

Jasper Johns Studio Thief Sentenced to One Year in Prison

Jasper Johns (centre) with James Meyer (right) James Meyer, the former assistant to Jasper Johns convicted of stealing and plotting to sell works from the artist’s studio, has been sentenced to over a year in prison.  “I am truly devastated that I destroyed the close relationship that I had with the man who was my mentor, employer and friend since I was 21-years-old,” Meyer said in court.

Read more at Reuters

 

Guggenheim Helsinki Designs Go on View Today

A proposal for the Guggenheim HelsinkiThe fully realized design proposals for the Guggenheim Helsinki are set to be unveiled at the Kunsthalle Helsinki today, marking the next step in the museum’s proposed expansion to Finland.  “We hope this exhibition and its programs will inspire the Finnish public to engage with the possibilities of a Guggenheim museum in Helsinki, and to think about the potential of a prominent site on their waterfront,” says Guggenheim Director Richard Armstrong.Read more at Art Daily

El Anatsui to Receive Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement

El Anatsui, via Venice BiennaleThe Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at this year’s Venice Biennale will go to Ghanian artist El Anatsui.  “The Golden Lion Award acknowledges not just his recent successes internationally, but also his artistic influence amongst two generations of artists working in West Africa,” says Biennale Director Paolo Baratta. “It is also an acknowledgment of the sustained, crucial work he has done as an artist, mentor and teacher for the past forty-five years.”

Read more at Venice Biennale

Christo Announces Major Project in Italy

Christo's sketch for the project, via Art NewspaperChristo has announced a new project aiming to create long immense, yellow fabric walkways spanning Lake Iseo in Lombardy, Italy.  The work will be the artist’s largest since his 2005 piece in New York’s Central Park, and the first since the death of his wife Jeanne-Claude.

Read more Art Newspaper

Institut Giacometti to Open to Public Next Year

Giacometti in his studio, via NYTThe Institut Giacometti, the foundation museum dedicated to the life and work of Alberto Giacometti, is set to open next year in Paris, featuring a meticulous recreation of the artist’s small, 270 square-foot studio.  The opening of the museum is the result of settled disputes over the estate of the artist, as brokered by Institut head Catherine Grenier, former deputy director of the Centre Pompidou.  “When I got here a year ago,” Grenier says, “this foundation was not at all well known, for one essential reason: It was closed to the public. My priority is to make its activities and its extraordinary collection accessible.”Read more at New York Times

New York – Piotr Uklanski: “Fatal Attraction” at The Met Through August 16th, 2015

Piotr Uklanski, The Nazis (1998), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, The Nazis (1998), via Art Observed

Currently on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art is a retrospective focusing on the work of Polish-born artist Piotr Uklanski, many of which are pulled from the rarely seen Joy of Photography series that the artist executed in the years following his move to the United States following the fall of Communism.Uklanski’s aesthetic project makes for an interesting conceptual fold in a period of photography already fascinated with the potentials for the repositioning and reappropriation as challenges to photographic integrity and history.  Cultural signifiers are afforded their own conceptual space, independent of the image itself, often lending a certain distance between the final product and the act of creation.  The skull itself is taken from a classic Dali image, but is altered with the presence of a male body, notably in a central position of dominance that reinserts a certain instability to the work.  Placing gender power structures in the work itself, Uklanski makes a subtle mockery of Dali’s sexualization of death, while underlining the Spanish artist’s presence in the generation of the work.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (GTXa) (2001), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (GTXa) (2001), via Art Observed

Elsewhere, Uklanski shows a more material fascination with the composition and capturing of the photographic image.  In one particularly compelling work, notable despite its small size, the artist renders a speed blur on a palm tree blowing in the wind.  The introduction of a violent forward motion to the work surface bears striking resemblance to the imagery of a scorched photograph, underlining a sense of destruction tied to the work’s execution.  In another, Uklanski creates a dizzying swirl from the act of exposure during film development.  Presenting a iridescent pool of colors, the work places the act of creation as image itself, the alluring material elements that enable the image’s existence.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Joannes Paulus PP II Karol Wojtyla) (2004), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Joannes Paulus PP II Karol Wojtyla) (2004), via Art Observed

The exhibition also features some of Uklanski’s exercises in accumulated images as a photographic archive, including a massive wall covered with photographs of various cultural depictions of Nazi’s, from press images to cartoons and propaganda posters.  The piece, exploring the variation in context and implication present in media depictions of “evil” forces, is a strange, yet occasionally chilling work, especially when examining characters that very nearly carry a cartoonish appeal.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Vesuvius) (2000), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Vesuvius) (2000), via Art Observed

The exhibition is also accompanied by another exhibition at the museum, showcasing a range of figurative selections from across the Met’s broad collection of holdings, curated by Uklanski himself.  Ranging from early Egyptian jasper carvings to contemporary photographs, the artist’s work here investigates the continued presence of both the erotic and the deadly throughout the range of artistic history.

Piotr Uklanski: Fatal Attraction, is on view through August 16th.  His exhibition of works from the museum collection closes on June 14th.

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Coconut Tree) (1998), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Coconut Tree) (1998), via Art Observed

Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Story of the Eye) (2013), via Art Observed
Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Story of the Eye) (2013), via Art Observed

— D. Creahan

Read more:
Piotr Uklanski: Fatal Attraction [Exhibition Site]
“Review: In ‘Fatal Attraction,’ Piotr Uklanski’s Unblinking Gaze” [NYT]

The Telegraph Goes Inside the Trends towards Art Collection and Exhibition as Status Symbols

Preview of Christie's spring sales in New York of Impressionist, Modern, Post-War And Contemporary Art, London, Britain - 10 Apr 2015The Telegraph looks at the growing competition among the world’s wealthiest for high-priced art trophies as status symbols, and notes the growing trend towards the establishment of non-profit foundations and museums as an even more appealing demonstration of wealth.  “Making your collection available to the public, understanding the journey you have been on, your taste,” says Celine Fressart, head of special projects at 1858 Ltd.  “That, really, is the ultimate in bragging rights.”Read more at The Telegraph

Armenian Pavilion to Commemorate 100 Years Since WWI Massacre

The Armenian pavilion on the San Lazzaro degli Armeni island, via Art NewspaperThis year’s Armenian pavilion at the Venice Biennale will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the massacre of more than one million Armenians by Ottoman Turks during the First World War.  The exhibition, titled Armenity and held on San Lazzaro degli Armeni island (home to the Armenian Catholic Monastery), will feature works by artist Sarkis, and is curated by Adelina Cüberyan von Fürstenberg, who has often worked with the artist.  “It is very important for me to keep the production going, for culture but also to keep the dialogue open,” Sarkis  says.  “We are the link between two pavilions. We are the breath. Whoever thinks otherwise is free to think so, of course.”

Read more at Art Newspaper

New York Times Looks at the Soon to be Completed Prada Foundation Complex in Milan

Prada Foundation, via NYTThe New York Times profiles Prada Foundation’s new Milan arts complex, designed by Rem Koolhaas and serving as the arts foundation’s permanent location.  “After more than 20 years of staging exhibitions around the world, my husband said he thought it was about time we do something permanent in Milan,” Miuccia Prada says.

Read more at New York Times

 

Art Institute of Chicago Receives Landmark $400 Million Gift

Andy Warhol, Mona Lisa Four Times, via Chicago TribuneThe Art Institute of Chicago has received a major donation of contemporary works this week, totaling 42 works valued at over $400 million, including iconic pieces from Andy Warhol, including an Elizabeth Taylor portrait and Mona Lisa Four Times, as well as several “Film Stills” from Cindy Sherman.  “It’s a powerful statement to have a collection of this international stature staying here in Chicago,” says Robert Levy, chairman of the Art Institute’s board. “It’s unbelievably exciting for the Art Institute, for the City of Chicago, for the entire art community of Chicago. It’s all good.”

Read more at Chicago Tribune

 

Early Reviews Praise New Whitney Museum

Whitney Museum, via Art NewspaperThe completed Whitney Museum is set to open in a matter of days, and articles in both New York Magazine and the New Yorker are already praising the space for its massive exhibition spaces and intriguing design by architect Renzo Piano.  “The audacity of the building shows that, yes, the Whitney will survive the new era,” writes Jerry Saltz.  “But the better question is whether it has found a way to thrive in it. And, believe it or not, I am in love with what this building represents.”

Read the articles below:
“New York Odyssey” [New Yorker]
“The New New Museum: How the Whitney might just solve the impossible problem of contemporary art” [New York Magazine]

Robert Rauschenberg Foundation No Longer Represented by Gagosian

Rauschenberg Foundation, via RhizomeThe Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is no longer represented by Gagosian Gallery, Artforum reports, a move which ends a partnership first started in 2008.  The organization will now look to Pace Gallery (which represented Rauschenberg later in his career), Thaddaeus Ropac, and São Paulo’s Luisa Strina for worldwide representation.  

Read more at Artforum

LACMA Announces $200 Million in Donations for 50th Anniversary Exhibition

Calder and Abstraction - From Avant-Garde to Iconic_Alexander Calder_LACMA_installation view1As the Los Angeles County Museum of Art continues its 50th-anniversary acquisitions campaign, the museum announced over $200 million in new art received as “anniversary gifts” to the institution.  A number of the works go on view this week as part of the museum’s “50 for 50: Gifts on the Occasion of LACMA’s Anniversary” exhibition.

Read more at New York Times

Alfred Taubman, Former Sotheby’s Owner and Philanthropist, Passes Away at 91

Alfred Taubman, via Detroit Free Press
Alfred Taubman, via Detroit Free Press

Alfred Taubman, the shopping mall developer and business mastermind who turned Sotheby’s from a private auction house to the publicly traded art market power it is today, has passed away at the age of 91.

Taubman earned his fortune during the years following World War II, re-engineering the American retail experience through his design and development of the modern shopping mall, and used his earnings to purchase Sotheby Parke Bernet for $130 million in 1983.  Within five years, Taubman had retooled its customer experience and sales strategies before taking the company public in 1988.  

Alfred Taubman, Mayor Coleman Young and Max Fisher, via Detroit Free Press

Taubman is also remembered for his generous philanthropy, including multimillion dollar donations to the University of Michigan.  “Aside from his support, which was substantial, I never stopped marveling at his energy and his concern that others might live a better life,” said Paul Anger, editor of the Detroit Free Press. “He never stopped looking for ways to make the community better, to make lives better, to give back.”

Taubman is survived by his wife, Judith Mazor Rounick.

Read more at Detroit Free Press