Global contemporary art events and news observed from New York City. Suggestion? Email us.
NEWS

Leonardo da Vinci Painting Inspires Mystery Over Depiction of Transparent Orb

October 19th, 2017

Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi, via The GuardianThe Guardian has a piece this week on the mysterious orb held by Christ in the Leonardo da Vinci painting currently on view at Christie’s. “Solid glass or crystal, whether shaped like an orb or a lens, produces magnified, inverted, and reversed images,” historian Walter Isaacson says of the image. “Instead, Leonardo painted the orb as if it were a hollow glass bubble that does not refract or distort the light passing through it.”
Read More »

In Rare Move, Several Florine Stettheimer Works Change Hands this Fall

October 19th, 2017

Florine Stettheimer, New York Liberty, 1918, via Art NewsIn an extremely rare occurrence, two works by Florine Stettheimer have changed hands this year, with one going into the collection of the Whitney Museum, and one going onto the open market.  Stettheimer rarely sold or gave her works away, making one’s appearance, let alone two in the same year, a momentous event. 
Read More »

Kader Attia Wins 2017 Joan Miró Prize

October 19th, 2017

Kader Attia, via Art DailyFrench-Algerian artist Kader Attia has been named  winner of the 2017 Joan Miró Prize.  “Attia’s passionate engagement with current affairs and with the shared fate of humanity [which] has close links to Joan Miró’s involvement in the critical episodes that marked his generation, while Attia’s unique take on complex, often traumatic, human relationships across cultures resonates with Miró’s universal aspirations,” the award’s jury said in a statement.
Read More »

REFERENCE LIBRARY

Walton Ford

Biography

Walton Ford was born in 1960 in Larchmont, New York. Ford graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with the intention of becoming a filmmaker, but later adapted his talents as a storyteller to his unique style of large-scale watercolor. Blending depictions of natural history with political commentary, Ford’s meticulous paintings satirize the history of colonialism and the continuing impact of slavery and other forms of political oppression on today’s social and environmental landscape. Each painting is as much a tutorial in flora and fauna as it is as a scathing indictment of the wrongs committed by nineteenth-century industrialists or, locating the work in the present, contemporary American consumer society. An enthusiast of the watercolors of John James Audubon, Ford celebrates the myth surrounding the renowned naturalist-painter while simultaneously repositioning him as an infamous anti-hero who, in reality, killed more animals than he ever painted. Each of Ford’s animal portraits doubles as a complex, symbolic system, which the artist layers with clues, jokes, and erudite lessons in colonial literature and folktales. Walton Ford is the recipient of several national awards and honors including a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Ford’s work has been featured at Bowdoin College Museum of Art, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art at Champion, and the Forum for Contemporary Art in St. Louis. After living in New York City for more than a decade, Walton Ford relocated his studio to Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Ford and his family reside in upstate New York.

Exterbal Links
Wikipedia Entry

More info about the artist coming soon.

Info suggestions: info@artobserved.com