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Market Thrives for Kerry James Marshall

June 19th, 2018

Kerry James Marshall, via NPRThe Art Newspaper looks at the thriving popularity of the work of Kerry James Marshall, after a record-breaking auction price drove new interest in his work, and a rampant demand for pieces, including those about to go on view at a show at David Zwirner’s London location. “We might not even keep a waiting list for the exhibition,” Zwirner says. “It’s going to be very hard to get a painting from that show, that’s for sure.”
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Theaster Gates Asks Collectors: “Support Artists That Live in Your Cities”

June 19th, 2018

Theaster Gates, via The GuardianTheaster Gates made a statement on supporting young artists in remarks last night at a party in Basel, asking collectors to support young artists making and selling their work. “You guys, I know that I’m the byproduct of people saying yes when they didn’t know me, saying yes at my potential and the possibility of the thing,” he said. “Throwing small dinners with me with five people that has turned into dinners for 200. I’m just grateful.”
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Art Newspaper Looks at Costs and Rewards of Major Art Prizes

June 19th, 2018

Glasgow-born artist Susan Philipsz is congratulated by friends and family after hearing that she has won the Turner Prize 2010, at the Tate Britain gallery, in central LondonA piece in Art Newspaper this week asks if arts awards really carry many of the benefits for winners that they claim, looking at a range of examples including a recent protest by a group of artists nominated for Germany’s Berlin Nationalgalerie Prize. “There is an unspoken assumption that the participants are likely to be remunerated by the market as a result of being nominated for or winning the prize,” the artists nominated for this prize said in an open statement. “We know that this is not always the case. The logic of artists working for exposure feeds directly into the normalization of the unregulated pay structures ubiquitous in the art field.”
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Walton Ford

Biography

Walton Ford was born in 1960 in Larchmont, New York. Ford graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with the intention of becoming a filmmaker, but later adapted his talents as a storyteller to his unique style of large-scale watercolor. Blending depictions of natural history with political commentary, Ford’s meticulous paintings satirize the history of colonialism and the continuing impact of slavery and other forms of political oppression on today’s social and environmental landscape. Each painting is as much a tutorial in flora and fauna as it is as a scathing indictment of the wrongs committed by nineteenth-century industrialists or, locating the work in the present, contemporary American consumer society. An enthusiast of the watercolors of John James Audubon, Ford celebrates the myth surrounding the renowned naturalist-painter while simultaneously repositioning him as an infamous anti-hero who, in reality, killed more animals than he ever painted. Each of Ford’s animal portraits doubles as a complex, symbolic system, which the artist layers with clues, jokes, and erudite lessons in colonial literature and folktales. Walton Ford is the recipient of several national awards and honors including a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Ford’s work has been featured at Bowdoin College Museum of Art, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art at Champion, and the Forum for Contemporary Art in St. Louis. After living in New York City for more than a decade, Walton Ford relocated his studio to Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Ford and his family reside in upstate New York.

Exterbal Links
Wikipedia Entry

More info about the artist coming soon.

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