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Everson Museum Receives $4.8 Million Gift

November 15th, 2018

Everson Museum, via Art NewsSyracuse’s Everson Museum of Art in New York has received a donation of $4.8 million, one of the largest gifts ever made to a Syracuse arts organization, given by board members Paul Philips and Sharon Sullivan. “This campaign is the most ambitious fundraising effort in our institution’s 120-year history,” says Elizabeth Dunbar, director and CEO of the Everson.
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New York Times Spotlights Art Storage Facilities

November 15th, 2018

Uovo, via NYTThe New York Times looks at the new storage facilities popping up in New York and around the US for art collectors. “Dealers have to store it, then they sell it to collectors who have to store it, then they donate it to museums that have to store it,” says art adviser Todd Levin.
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Knight Foundation Donates $435,000 to Digital Arts Projects

November 15th, 2018

Gray Area Theater, via Art NewsThe Knight Foundation in Miami, Florida, has earmarked a total of $435,000 for four digital art projects. “As in many parts of modern society, technology advancements have revealed both new opportunities and challenges for artists,” says Chris Barr, director of arts at the Knight Foundation. “At the moment, there are few organizations providing support systems for digital art. These projects are filling that gap, helping artists navigate and thrive in this new terrain.”
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Jean-Pierre Lehmann

Collector’s Birthdate: NA

Lehmann and wife, Chelsea-based art dealer, Rachel, have resided in New York since they moved from Geneva in 1992 and have been dedicated collectors of art for longer than 20 years.

Lehmann’s collection includes early works by Jeff Koons, Matthew Barney, Kara Walker, Jeff Wall and Gabriel Orozco. Notable works of his collection include Gilbert & George’s “Hands up”, Lisa Yuskavage’s “XLP” and Koon’s “Elephant”.

On contemporary artists:

“One of the problems artists today are going to face is that life, in general, is much longer than it used to be. You don’t have artists dying of tuberculosis or alcoholism when they are thirty-five or forty and leaving very interesting works – but very limited quantities, because their lives were limited. Now, most artists will probably live like everybody else until eighty, ninety or one hundred, and if they want to produce until the end, they’ll have problems, because their productive years will be much longer. Probably then you will see the difference between the good and the less good.”

Lindemann, Adam. Collecting Contemporary: Los Angeles, Taschen GmbH 2006.