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Michelangelo Sketch Sells for $24 Million in Paris

May 19th, 2022

A recently unearthed Michelangelo sketch, considered to be the artist’s first nude, has sold  at Christie’s Paris for a record 23 million euros ($24 million). “Michelangelo has decided to make the figure into something that corresponded more to his aesthetic by making him much more robust and monumental, while at the same time keeping the fragility of the figure, who is exposed and shivering” as he awaits baptism,” says Christie’s Old Masters expert Stijn Alsteens.
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Basquiat Work Sells for $85 Million at Phillips $224.9 Million Night

May 19th, 2022

The Jean-Michel Basquiat work from the collection of Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa had a strong return to auction last night at Phillips, where it achieved $85 Million, part of a total sale of  $224.9 million, the highest in the company’s history. 
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Independent Art Fair to Launch New Fair Around 20th Century Work

May 17th, 2022

The Independent Art Fair will launch a new fair in September this year that will focus on 20th Century Works. “Over the years, there has been a shift, with next-generation dealers showing a more diverse group of artists and territories, geographically, socially, politically,” says Independent director Elizabeth Dee. “They are looking forward and looking back, saying, ‘We need to have a canon that looks like our program.’”
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

Jean-Pierre Lehmann

Collector’s Birthdate: NA

Lehmann and wife, Chelsea-based art dealer, Rachel, have resided in New York since they moved from Geneva in 1992 and have been dedicated collectors of art for longer than 20 years.

Lehmann’s collection includes early works by Jeff Koons, Matthew Barney, Kara Walker, Jeff Wall and Gabriel Orozco. Notable works of his collection include Gilbert & George’s “Hands up”, Lisa Yuskavage’s “XLP” and Koon’s “Elephant”.

On contemporary artists:

“One of the problems artists today are going to face is that life, in general, is much longer than it used to be. You don’t have artists dying of tuberculosis or alcoholism when they are thirty-five or forty and leaving very interesting works – but very limited quantities, because their lives were limited. Now, most artists will probably live like everybody else until eighty, ninety or one hundred, and if they want to produce until the end, they’ll have problems, because their productive years will be much longer. Probably then you will see the difference between the good and the less good.”

Lindemann, Adam. Collecting Contemporary: Los Angeles, Taschen GmbH 2006.