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Brad Troemel Profiled in New Yorker

January 23rd, 2017

Brad Troemel, via New YorkerBrad Troemel is the subject of a profile in the New Yorker this week, which reflects on the artist’s recent work both in and outside the traditional gallery system, and his approach towards making art that often defies categorization.  “At what point do artists using social media stop making art for the idealized art world audience they want,” the piece quotes from one of his essays, “and start embracing the new audience they have?” 
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New York Times Notes Uptick in Sales Through Instagram

January 23rd, 2017

Faberge art, via NYTThe New York Times profiles the increased potential in recent years for Instagram as a marketing tool, noting a considerable uptick in works sold through the platform.  “It has hit a sweet spot in the market for sharing information,” Anders Petterson, one of the contributors to the Hiscox Online Art Trade Report says, “but no one saw this coming as a sales tool.”
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Catherine Opie Joins Gallerists and Artists in LA Women’s March

January 23rd, 2017

Catherine Opie, via LA TimesThe LA Times has a piece today on the participation of a number of artists and gallerists in the Los Angeles protests against Donald Trump, counting Catherine Opie and a range of gallerists from across the city.  “Artists need to bring that voice of opposition to this cause — with every drop of blood and every tear,” Opie says.
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Cairo’s Museum of Islamic Art Reopens After Bombing

January 23rd, 2017

Egypt AntiquitiesEgypt’s Museum of Islamic Art has reopened for the first time since being badly damaged by a car bomb in 2014.  “I’m amazed. I haven’t been to the Louvre, but I feel like I’m somewhere a lot more beautiful,” said Hussein Ismail, a visitor to the museum.
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European Police Make Major Arrests in Crackdown on Art Trafficking Ring

January 23rd, 2017

factum-arte-warehouse-in-madrid-via-new-yorkerSeventy-five people have been arrested across Europe as part of a crackdown on the trafficking of illegal art and artifacts, the New York Times reports.  Over 3,000 objects were recovered as part of the operation, which focused around works smuggled out of war-torn regions. 
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Art News Reflects on History of NEA Clashes with Government

January 23rd, 2017

Artists Space 1989, via Art NewsArt News has a piece on President Donald Trump’s proposal to eliminate the NEA, reflecting back to the presidency of George H.W. Bush, when the organization faced similar threats of defunding, particularly in situations where the government sought to limit funding over exhibitions’ political content.  The piece reflects on a number of contentious shows during the era, including an exhibition of Robert Mapplethorpe photos, and an exhibition devoted to the AIDS epidemic.
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The Guardan Profiles Anderson Ranch Arts Workshop in Colorado

January 23rd, 2017

Tom Sachs, via The GuardianThe Guardian spotlights Anderson Ranch outside of Aspen, a former sheep farm that has become a major workshop site for artists working in a range of media, counting Tom Sachs and Christo among its recent residents.  “Anderson Ranch is unique because we’re a mix of both education and inspiration,” says executive director Nancy Wilhelms.  “People of all ages and abilities come here and learn new skills or unlock their inner artist, or learn something new about themselves through art.”
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Marisa Merz Profiled in New Yorker

January 23rd, 2017

Marisa Merz at Met Breuer, via New YorkerThe New Yorker profiles the life and work of Marisa Merz, whose work is the subject of a major retrospective at the Met Breuer, opening this week.  The artist’s long work as the only female members of the Arte Povera, and her ongoing work at the age of 90, is featured alongside her expansive show at the Met.
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Tate Modern to Exhibition Rare Full Series of Giacometti Plasters from 1956

January 23rd, 2017

Giacometti with Plasters, via GuardianA series of plaster sculptures by Alberto Giacometti will be brought together since their first exhibition since their creation in 1956, the Guardian reports, going on view at The Tate Modern this summer.  “This is one of the most ambitious restoration projects that the foundation has undertaken and it is very exciting that they wish to do it for Tate,” says Tate Modern director, Frances Morris. “I have to say it is only for Tate, because despite the restoration the works will in perpetuity be very vulnerable.”
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Jay Gorney and Lisa Cooley Joining Paula Cooper Gallery

January 23rd, 2017

Lisa Cooley, via Art NewsJay Gorney and Lisa Cooley have joined Paula Cooper Gallery, bringing an extensive range of experience to the gallery from their respective past ventures.  “For me, Paula Cooper Gallery represents integrity, long-term vision, and connoisseurship, qualities that I wish were in greater abundance in the emerging art market,” Cooley says.
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

New York – Rita Ackermann: “Kline Rape” at Hauser & Wirth Through January 14th, 2017

January 4th, 2017

rita-ackermann-kline-nurses-2015-via-art-observed
Rita Ackermann, Kline Nurses (2015), via Art Observed

Taking over Hauser & Wirth’s temporary exhibition space at 548 West 22nd Street, Rita Ackermann is currently presenting a broad range of new works drawing on her ongoing investigations into the modes and structures of mainstream painting.  A relentless experimenter with the conception, construction, and presentation of the painted canvas, Ackermann’s work here spans a range of varied approaches that further her dual interrogations of the material bounds of the painting, and the gestural or technical conceits used in its realization.

Rita Ackermann, Kline Rape III (2016), via Art Observed
Rita Ackermann, Kline Rape III (2016), via Art Observed

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London — Pat Steir at Dominique Lévy Through January 28th, 2017

January 1st, 2017

Pat Steir, Elephant Waterfall (1990), via Art Observed
Pat Steir, domini (1990), via Art Observed

Stepping into Dominique Lévy gallery space, one is immediately greeted by the towering columns of paint that make up artist Pat Steir’s waterfall paintings.  Opening her first exhibition in London in twenty-eight years, the artist’s exhibition features fourteen works made over the corresponding decades, from 1990-2011.  Tracing consistent evolutions in her style and hand in conjunction with stylistic divergences and experiments, the survey engages in an ongoing dialogue over her interests in both control and abstraction. Read More »

London – William Kentridge: “Thick Time” at Whitechapel Gallery Through January 15th, 2017

December 31st, 2016

William Kentridge, The Refusal of Time (2012), via Whitechapel Gallery
William Kentridge, The Refusal of Time (2012), all images courtesy the artist via White Chapel Gallery.

Now through January 15th, Whitechapel Gallery in London is presenting a new exhibition of work by William Kentridge, one of South Africa’s pre-eminent artists. William Kentridge: Thick Time features six large-scale works created between 2003 and 2016, spanning a range of mediums and thematics that reflect Kentridge’s intense engagement with theories of time and relativity, the history of colonialism, and revolutionary politics. Read More »

New York – Mark Van Yetter: “The Terrifying Abyss of Skepticism” at Bridget Donahue Through January 8th, 2017

December 30th, 2016

Mark Van Yetter, A Lack of Imagination Seems to be the Problem (2016), via Art Observed
Mark Van Yetter, A Lack of Imagination Seems to be the Problem (2016), via Art Observed

On view at the Bridget Donahue Gallery, the works of Mark Van Yetter demonstrate the power and playfulness of association. The Terrifying Abyss of Skepticism, composed of a series of paintings on paper, allows for multiple readings, drawing on the artist’s wide scope of influences, including ancient artifacts and art objects, old masters, graphic illustrations, and folk art.  In the expansive range of graphic possibilities and interpretive frameworks provided by these references, Van Yetter’s work calls upon the viewer to locate links between each of his works, and the historical contexts they draw on.

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New York – Joel Shapiro at Dominique Lévy Through January 7th, 2017

December 29th, 2016

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Joel Shapiro, Untitled (1980), All images via Dominique Lévy.

Now through January 7th, Dominique Lévy is hosting the major first survey of early wood reliefs by American sculptor Joel Shapiro, an exhibition that seeks to demonstrate the trajectory and development of Shapiro’s career, while foregrounding his work with pieces from the late 1970’s and ultimately culminating in a recent body of room-sized sculptural assemblages.  The wood reliefs, presented alongside a new site-specific installation, trace a practice constantly in pursuit of uses of color and mass to shape perceptions of space while exploring individual material interactions.  This marks the first time the series of wood reliefs will be comprehensively surveyed.  Read More »

New York – Paul McCarthy: “Raw Spinoffs Continuations” at Hauser & Wirth Through February 4th, 2016

December 28th, 2016

Paul McCarthy, White Snow Dwarf, Dopey (Affected Original) (2016), via Art Observed
Paul McCarthy, White Snow Dwarf, Dopey (Affected Original) (2016), via Art Observed

Returning to his ongoing fascination with the iconography and commodification of the legend of Snow White, in conjunction with reprisals of varied other series from the past 15 years of his practice, Paul McCarthy’s newest exhibition at Hauser & Wirth is a flurry of both subject matter and materials.  Massive, flaking and chipping sculptures are spread throughout the gallery’s cavernous exhibition space, each one drawing on threads of both the historical and cultural in the American psyche.  Pulling from a wide range of works that define the artist’s sculptural practice (in conversation with his video and film productions), the show offers an expansive exploration of both his sense of humor, and his keen eye for commentary.

Paul McCarthy, Puppet (2005-2008), via Art Observed
Paul McCarthy, Puppet (2005-2008), via Art Observed

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New York – Kai Althoff: “and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern)” at MoMA Through January 22nd, 2017

December 27th, 2016

Kai Althoff, Untitled (2015), Courtesy the Cranford Collection, London © Kai Althoff
Kai Althoff, Untitled (2015), Courtesy the Cranford Collection, London © Kai Althoff

Situated atop the Museum of Modern Art, Kai Althoff’s current survey exhibition, and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern), first presents itself as an elaborate visual pun, turning the sixth floor of the museum into a veritable attic space for the artist’s body of watercolors, drawings and sculpture, each shown alongside other objects in an approach to the work that opens new, and often disturbing, narratives in the progression and aesthetic explorations in the artist’s career.

Kai Althoff, and then leave me to the common swifts (Installation View), Courtesy MoMA, Photograph © Kai Althoff
Kai Althoff, and then leave me to the common swifts (Installation View), Courtesy MoMA, Photograph © Kai Althoff

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New York – Ai Weiwei’s Return to New York, at Jeffrey Deitch, Mary Boone and Lisson Gallery Through December 23rd, 2016

December 23rd, 2016

Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Lisson (Installation View), via Art Observed
Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Lisson (Installation View), via Art Observed

Ai Weiwei has returned to New York City for the first time since the return of his passport from the Chinese government, opening a quartet of exhibitions across its urban expanses that offer a strikingly deep and varied series of perspectives into the artist’s practice over the past few years.  Spread out across both locations of the Mary Boone Gallery, in addition to a show at Lisson, and one at Jeffrey Deitch Projects, the artist’s selection of works presents a nuanced look at his ongoing investment in the defense and articulation of universal human rights, moving from China, to Syria, and beyond.

Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Mary Boone (Installation View), via Art Observed
Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Mary Boone (Installation View), via Art Observed

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New York — Mike Kelley: “Memory Ware” at Hauser & Wirth Through December 23rd, 2016

December 23rd, 2016

Mike Kelley, Balanced by Mass and Personification (2001), all photos via Osman Can Yerebakan for Art Observed
Mike Kelley, Balanced by Mass and Personification (2001), all photos via Osman Can Yerebakan for Art Observed

One of the most influential American artists of the past 30 years, Mike Kelley‘s considerable body of work runs a long thread of intricately connected and often curiously diverse modes of working and creating, often creating internal exchanges and conversations that further the artist’s exploration of memory, time, and personal histories.  The late artist’s Memory Ware series has long stood as one of the less explored and understood series from his catalog, even though Kelley continued to make these works until close to his untimely passing in 2012.  Consisting of hundreds of different objects, the series manifests some of Kelley’s most fundamental thematic concerns through a reliance on bizarre fusions of kitsch, often drawing collective and personal memories, American folk art, consumerist tendencies, and pop culture into close proximity. Read More »

New York – Ragnar Kjartansson at Luhring Augustine Through December 22nd, 2016

December 22nd, 2016

Scenes from Western Culture (2015), via Art Observed
Ragnar Kjartansson, Scenes from Western Culture (2015), via Art Observed

Like much of his previous work, artist Ragnar Kjartansson’s latest exhibition at Luhring Augustine explores a variety of idyllic, everyday moments through a variety of mediums, and spread between the gallery’s two exhibition spaces.   The artist’s work on view in Chelsea draws his series Scenes from Western Culture and Architecture and Morality, while the artist’s work in Bushwick presents a new video piece World Light – The Life and Death of an Artist (2015).  Through an examination of broad themes and varied conceptual focuses, the exhibition draws on the artist’s ongoing interest in literature and pop culture, and their abilities to explore sensations of tranquility, joy and loss.

Ragnar Kjartansson, Architecture and Morality (2016), via Art Observed
Ragnar Kjartansson, Architecture and Morality (2016), via Art Observed

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