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MoMA Extends Friday and Saturday Hours Until 9PM

August 16th, 2017

Louise Lawler. Pollyanna (adjusted to fit), distorted for the times. 2007/2008/2012. As adjusted for the MoMA exhibition WHY PICTURES NOW, 2017. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures. © 2017 Louise LawlerThe Museum of Modern Art will stay open until 9PM on Fridays and Saturdays for the rest of the year, effectively extending its hours of free Friday admission as well. The museum’s late hours will offer extended opportunities for visitors to browse the collection through December 30th.
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Alberto Giacometti Drawings Discovered in Holdings of Late Antiques Dealer

August 16th, 2017

Giacometti Drawings, via The GuardianA set of drawings found in a London antique shop are believed to be lost works by Alberto Giacometti, The Guardian reports. The works were found while archiving the holdings of antiques dealer Eila Grahame, whose estate records showed some indication that the works might exist, but gave little detail of their contents. “At the time we didn’t know if it was two pieces of paper, two large sketches, whether they were done on the back of a cigarette packet or whether they were done on large canvases,” says Martin Millard, a director at Cheffins auction house, which is in charge of sorting through Grahame’s estate. “We didn’t know what we were looking for.”
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Artists Evicted from Beijing’s Caochangdi Art District

August 15th, 2017

Evicted artists, via ArtforumA group of artists have been evicted from their homes and studios in the Caochangdi art district of northeastern Beijing by the Chinese government, Artforum reports. The homes had been slotted for demolition, causing protest and resistance from their residents. 
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Met Museum Sees Impressive Gains to Traffic After Open Access Initiative

August 15th, 2017

Met Museum, via Art DailyThe Met Museum has a blog post this week on its continued Open Access initiative, noting impressive gains in traffic and engagement with the museum’s collection, which has been uploaded in full to its website. “Overall traffic to the online collection has increased by 17%, image downloads have increased by 64%, and we’re seeing that users who download an image have a significantly stronger engagement with the collection: they spend five times longer on the site, and visit five times more pages,” Digital Officer Loic Tallon writes in the piece.
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Latin American Galleries Launch Collaborative Space in Glendale

August 15th, 2017

An image from 918 Ruberta Avenue in Glendale, via Art NewspaperMexico City-based dealer Brett Schultz has embarked on a new project in the Glendale area of Los Angeles County, opening a collaborative exhibition space run by a group of five Latin American art galleries. Members are Galería Agustina Ferreyra (San Juan), Lodos (Mexico City), Proyectos Ultravioleta (Guatemala City), Carne (Bogotá), and Schultz’s BWSMX, formerly Yautepec (Mexico City).
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Stolen Willem de Kooning Painting Resurfaces 30 Years Later

August 14th, 2017

de Kooning, via NYTA Willem de Kooning painting stolen from the University of Arizona Museum of Art over 30 years ago has been found in a New Mexico antiques shop. “For us, it was the equivalent of finding a lost wallet and returning it,” says David Van Auker, who found the piece. “It was a no-brainer.”
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Louisville Mayor Commissions Investigation Into City’s Public Art and Its Relationship to Confederate History

August 14th, 2017

Mayor Greg Fischer, via ArtforumFollowing the clashes between white supremacists and counter-protestors in Charlottesville, VA this weekend, Louisville’s mayor Greg Fischer has directed the Louisville Commission on Public Art to begin a review of all publicly held art to determine if any of its pieces could be interpreted as honoring bigotry, racism or hatred. “I recognize that some people say all these monuments should be left alone, because they are part of our history,” Fischer said in a statement. “But we need to discuss and interpret our history from multiple perspectives and from different viewpoints. That’s why a community conversation is crucial.” 
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Art Newspaper Reflects on Opening of Pablo Picasso Sculpture in Downtown Chicago

August 12th, 2017

Chicago's Picasso, via Art NewspaperA piece in the Art Newspaper traces the initially contentious history of Pablo Picasso’s now iconic public sculpture in downtown Chicago, which earned considerable derision and criticism when it was first unveiled in 1967. “The tone, and I remember it so vividly, was that we had been had, this alien beast or whatever it is with no name arrived and some poseur artist has played a joke on the city,” says Mark Kelly, Chicago’s current cultural commissioner of its first showing. “I would like to believe that I became a little more open and curious to my urban surroundings and to what was considered art.” 
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Berkshire Museum Faces Criticism Over Deaccession Plans

August 11th, 2017

Berkshire Museum, via Berkshire MuseumPBS has a piece on the recent controversy over the Berkshires Museum’s decision to deaccession a collection of 40 paintings from its collection, including pieces by Alexander Calder, and the protests raised in response.  The museum has claimed the works it wants to sell were “deemed no longer essential to the the Museum’s new interdisciplinary programs,” but is facing criticism over its treatment of the pieces as a rote financial asset.
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New York Times Profiles Washington D.C.’s Dupont Underground, An Arts Space in a Former Subway Station

August 11th, 2017

Dupont Underground, via NYTThe New York Times profiles Dupont Underground, a former subway station in Washington D.C. that has been converted into an arts space. “It’s one of those spaces in the city that becomes mythical because it just hasn’t been open to the public for so long,” said Brianne Nadeau, a member of the City Council.
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New York — “Lyric on a Battlefield” at Gladstone Gallery Through July 28, 2017

July 24th, 2017

Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels
Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

“No one writes lyric on a battlefield. On a map stuck with arrows,” begins Quarto, a 2009 poem by the feminist author and essayist Adrienne Rich. Adopting its name from the metaphorical expression Rich uses in her poem’s first line, Gladstone Gallery’s summer group exhibition, Lyric on a Battlefield, seeks impressions of beauty inherent in the struggles and joys of everyday experience through the poetic and personal narrative of life. Organized by Miciah Hussey, the exhibition pairs established names such as Suzanne McClelland, Anne Collier, and Ellen Berkenblit with a younger generation of artists like Monique Mouton and Louisa Clement.

Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels
Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

The introspective and meditative nature of the lyric, in terms of offering a highly subjective interpretation of time and space, infuses each juxtaposition of collective human experiences, like loss, intimacy, and memory, with a sense of vivid and often urgent vitality.  Presented here, the show’s works turn this sense of humanity into a powerful rumination on modern society, and the varied experiences that undergird our negotiation with everyday existence.

The biggest discovery of the exhibition is f.marquespenteado, the gender-nonconforming pseudonym of the Brazilian artist Fernando Marques Penteado, who combines traditional embroidery methods with found objects and text to orchestrate installations brimming with complex narratives. Although the artist is an established name in his native country and in Europe, his presence in New York has remained somewhat limited, with the exception of his inclusion in the Jewish Museum’s 2015 group exhibition Orthodox, which had aptly focused on artists outside mainstream dynamics of the art world.

The artist’s ability to infuse emotion, sensuality and soul to everyday objects allows him to marry domesticity with sexuality, while his texts add a sense of vivacity and character to his often mundane materials. The embroidery he accentuates and defamiliarizes his arbitrary objects which stems from a dedication to a practice that has been traditionally associated with feminine labor. In one of the installations, two pairs of clogs are placed in front of a wooden rake and dried flowers, standing in for a pair of absent bodies of two male lovers whose relationship is recounted through an imaginary interview conducted with one of them.

Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels
Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels
Lyric On a Battlefield (Installation View), Photos by David Regen. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

By contrast, Suzanne McClelland’s large scale double-sided painting Reg Park and the Hard Gainers exemplifies the Brooklyn-based painter’s decades-long investigation of text, data, and image culture through the lens of American ideals such as success, fame, and class. What appear on the surface as tempestuous and fervent abstract paintings, emanating from loose hand gestures, encapsulate her research and analysis-heavy process regarding facts prevalent in our society, such as male privilege and unjust distribution of opportunity. Adorned with slightly abstracted letters and names, McClelland’s abstract paintings further the artist’s interpretation of information as a fluctuating entity through their double-sided natures that offer alternative paths to same ends.

This sense of text and movement, experience and action, running throughout the show makes for an intriguing engagement with intersections of text and the life it describes. Lyric on a Battlefield is on view at Gladstone Gallery through July 28, 2017.

— O.C. Yerebakan

Read more:
Gladstone Gallery [Exhibition Page]

New York – Harumi Yamaguchi Presented by Project Native Informant at Bridget Donahue Gallery for CONDO New York Through July 29th, 2017

July 23rd, 2017

Harumi Yamaguchi at Project Native Informant, via Art Observed
Harumi Yamaguchi, Fight Mode (1976) via Art Observed

Tucked in the back room of Bridget Donahue‘s Bowery exhibition space lies Project Native Informant’s contribution to the itinerant exhibition project CONDO: Harumi Yamaguchi’s first US solo exhibition. Yamaguchi, a commercial artist active from the 1970’s onwards, is an expert air-brusher. Not unlike fellow artist and commercial illustrator Hajime Sorayama, her illustrations portray human figures in an idealized setting: perfect lighting, unblemished skin, and gleaming white teeth, a sense of almost unnerving beauty amplified by their provocative poses and minimalist backdrops.

Harumi Yamaguchi at Project Native Informant Hosted by Bridget Donahue, via Bridget Donahue
Harumi Yamaguchi at Project Native Informant Hosted by Bridget Donahue, via Bridget Donahue

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Paris – Alex Israel: “Summer 2″ at Almine Rech Through July 29th, 2017

July 22nd, 2017

Alex Israel, Pelican (2017), via Almine Rech
Alex Israel, Pelican (2017), via Almine Rech

Marking a new stage in his engagement with the cultural landscape and natural phenomena of the California coastline, Alex Israel returns to Almine Rech’s Paris location this month, presenting his aptly titled solo exhibition, Summer 2.  Drawn from the artist’s work on his forthcoming feature-length film, SPF-18, Israel has created a series of aluminum and acrylic wetsuit sculptures, text-based pieces, and an extremely detailed pelican sculpture, each presenting its own twist on the familiar iconography of the beach environments he has so often used as source material. Read More »

London — Lisa Yuskavage at David Zwirner Gallery Through July 28th, 2017

July 21st, 2017

Lisa Yuskavage, Déjà Vu (2017) via Art Observed
Lisa Yuskavage, Déjà Vu (2017) via Art Observed

On view at David Zwirner Gallery‘s London exhibition space, now through July 28th, is a new series of new paintings by Lisa Yuskavage.  Often associated with the re-emergence of figuration in contemporary painting, Yuskavage’s work is noted for its psychedelic, colorfully vibrant style, and its often sexually-charged subject matter. Her paintings embody a unique genre of portraiture—a blending of imagined and contemporary subjects set against classical tropes and icons of human sexuality. In this series, Yuskavage draws upon the world of American hippies, where slinky, bodacious women lounge about and cavort with semi-nude men. It is worth noting that while the hyper-sexualized women remain the dominant characters, the inclusion of men in her work is a fairly new departure for Yuskavage. Read More »

New York – Louise Lawler: ‘WHY PICTURES NOW’ at MoMA Through July 30th, 2017

July 20th, 2017

Louise Lawler, Life After (Faces), (2006:2007), via Art Observed
Louise Lawler, Life After (Faces), (2006/2007), via Art Observed

The Museum of Modern Art has opened the first New York museum survey of the work of Louise Lawler, moving throughout a broad range of the American artist’s conceptual exercises and investigations into the power dynamics and aesthetic underpinnings of the art world at large.  Running from the artist’s early photographic investigations and her explorations into the presentation, representation, and, as she titles it “re-presentation,” of various works and images from the expanse of modern art history, the exhibition is a bold reflection on the artist’s work throughout the past 40 years, as well as a rumination on the continued role of the museum as a site for the understanding of the field’s history more broadly. Read More »

New York – “The Horizontal” at Cheim & Read Through August 31st, 2017

July 19th, 2017

Matthew Wong, Last Summer in Santa Monica (2017), via Sarah Cohen for Art Observed
Matthew Wong, Last Summer in Santa Monica (2017), via Sarah Cohen for Art Observed

Drawing on a continuous engagement with the poetics of the horizon and its recurring presence across the history of contemporary painting, Cheim & Read has opened its summer group exhibition, The Horizontal.  Culling together a diverse group of artists from the past eighty years of artistic practice, the show is an investigation and reflection on the horizon as a motif weaving its way throughout varied investigations of modern art-making.  Photography, painting, drawing and print-making each make their presence felt throughout the exhibition, inviting a deep perspective on how the skyline, and its attendant impact on the viewer’s perception, has continued to inspire artist’s work into the modern day.

Louise Fishman, Bitter Herb (1988), via Sarah Cohen for Art Observed
Louise Fishman, Bitter Herb (1988), via Sarah Cohen for Art Observed

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London – Pablo Picasso: “Minotaurs and Matadors” at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill through August 25th, 2017

July 18th, 2017

Edward Quinn, Picasso wearing a bull’s head intended for bullfighter's training, La Californie, Cannes (1959), courtesy of Gagosian
Edward Quinn, Picasso wearing a bull’s head intended for bullfighter’s training, La Californie, Cannes (1959), courtesy of Gagosian

A true Spaniard at heart, Pablo Picasso had a great affinity for bullfighting. With a keen appreciation for the sport, it proved to be a continuous theme throughout his work. Picasso’s oeuvre is riddled with symbolism as well as direct pictorial representations of bulls, matadors and the mythological minotaur— the half-man, half-beast that so piqued Picasso’s interest. Minotaurs and Matadors, on view at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill gallery space through August 25th, a show expertly curated by Sir John Patrick Richardson, celebrates Picasso’s passion and link to both his traditional Spanish roots and the mythological landscapes that so inspired him in turn. Read More »

New York: Roni Horn at Hauser & Wirth Through July 29th, 2017

July 17th, 2017

Roni Horn, Water Double v.3 (2013-2015), via Ondine Charlesworth for Art Observed
Roni Horn, Water Double v.3 (2013-2015), via Ondine Charlesworth for Art Observed

Currently on view at Hauser & Wirth’s recently opened exhibition space on 22nd Street, artist Roni Horn is presenting a quartet of new bodies of work, running through the artist’s broad and often adventurous approach to her chosen media.  Ranging from, drawing and painting through to sculpture, photography and conceptual work, Horn’s practice is on full view here, always centering back on questions of perception, representation, identity and memory.  Deconstructing both linguistic systems and visual cues, Horn’s new pieces continue her subtly exploratory and phenomenologically resonant practice. Read More »

London—Adrián Villar Rojas: Untitled from the series ‘The Theater of Disappearance’ at Marian Goodman Gallery through July 21st, 2017

July 13th, 2017
Adrián Villar Rojas, Untitled from the series ‘The Theater of Disappearance (2017) via Art Observed

Adrián Villar Rojas, Untitled from the series ‘The Theater of Disappearance (2017) via Art Observed

On view through July 21st, Adrián Villar Rojas’ Untitled, from the series ‘The Theater of Disappearance’ transforms the first floor of Marian Goodman’s London gallery space from a white-washed, airy viewing space to a room devoid of any natural light. Running concurrently with exhibitions of the same name at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria and the NEON Foundation in Athens, the London exhibition is an immersive display. Like the parallel exhibitions, Marian Goodman Gallery features a new site-specific work which wholly claims the exhibition space, changing the domain of perception and creating a rupture. Read More »

New York – Hanne Darboven and Kishio Suga at Dia:Chelsea Through July 29th, 2017

July 11th, 2017

Hanne Darboven, Kulturgeschichte 1880–1983 (1980-1983) (detail), via Art Observed
Hanne Darboven, Kulturgeschichte 1880–1983 (1980-1983) (detail), via Art Observed

The Dia Art Foundation has opened a dialogue between the work of Kishio Suga and Hanne Darboven at its Chelsea exhibition space this winter, a discourse over decades and continents, time frames and objects through conceptual engagements with each artist’s respective local and social contexts.  Compiling Darboven’s expansive piece Kulturgeschichte 1880–1983 (Cultural History 1880–1983, 1980–83) in conversation with a series of Suga’s historical and recent works, the pair of shows delve into the act of addressing and working with history, in exchange with the inherently material practice of making art.

Kishio Suga, Law of Halted Space (2016) via Art Observed
Kishio Suga, Law of Halted Space (2016) via Art Observed    Read More »