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Anish Kapoor Interviewed in The Guardian Over Work with Vantablack

September 26th, 2016

anish-kapoor-via-the-guardianThe Guardian looks at Anish Kapoor’s work with the developers of Vantablack, and the artist’s attempts to utilize the occasionally difficult material in the creation of new work.  “[Vantablack] is very technical. It needs like a furnace – pressure and heat – before this material can do what it does, [which is] become super black,” Kapoor says. “It’s necessarily a collaboration between them and me. I say, ‘C’mon guys – we can make it bigger and we can make it applicable in others ways.’”
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Simon de Pury Interviewed in The Guardian

September 26th, 2016

simon-de-pury-via-the-guardianThe Guardian sits down with Simon de Pury this week to share his views on the market, working a crowd from the rostrum, and the future of online art sales.  “Information once only accessible to insiders is now accessible to everybody. It has helped the market become easier to navigate,” he says.  “Art sold online will increase a lot over the next few years, especially if you are selling art between $10,000 and $2m – that segment of the market can be sold more effectively through the internet. At the top end, auctioning will continue in the bricks and mortar way.”
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Shoot The Lobster Takes Over Martos Gallery Outpost in LA

September 26th, 2016

shoot-the-lobster-la-via-art-newsMartos Gallery has moved its project gallery, Shoot the Lobster, into its Los Angeles exhibition space, changing its function from a Martos outpost to a permanent home for Shoot the Lobster.  “After two years of many memorable exhibitions and events, Martos Gallery LA has closed its doors to make way for the second STL project space,” the gallery said. “This space, like its East Coast accomplice, will feature a mix of exhibitions, performances, concerts, pop-ups, and more.”
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NYT Spotlights Work of K11 Art Foundation

September 26th, 2016

artist-cheng-ran-via-nytThe New York Times profiles the work of the K11 Art Foundation this week, and its work in supporting the careers of young Chinese artists both home and abroad.  “The reason so many curators listen to us is because we are not a gallery, we are not dealers, and we do not represent artists — our list is more academic,” says founder Adrian Cheng.


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France Promises $100 Million for Cultural Preservation in Middle East

September 26th, 2016

franc%cc%a7ois-hollande-via-art-newspaperThe French government has pledged $100 million to fund cultural heritage protection in the Middle East, providing resources for preservation, restoration and storage to threatened cultural sites and institutions.  “This mission began a month ago,” says Benoit Paumier, a former official of the Ministry of Culture.   “The point of departure, which shocked the French population, was the destruction of Palmyra by the terrorists. At that point, the president of the republic asked the president of the Louvre, Jean-Luc Martinez, to prepare a report on how the international community could respond to preserve the cultural heritage of humanity.”  
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British Museum Acquires Important Series of Picasso Prints

September 26th, 2016

pablo-picasso-print-via-the-guardianThe British Museum has made a landmark purchase of a group of mint-condition prints by Pablo Picasso, a selection that fills in a gap in the museum’s collection of the artist’s work in the medium.  “This is the last important gap to be filled in the British Museum’s representation of Picasso’s print work,” says Stephen Coppell, curator of the museum’s modern prints and drawings collection. “It is very important that we were able to acquire this work. It is one of the greatest achievements in graphic art.” 
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Guy Wildenstein’s Tax Evasion Trial Begins in Paris

September 23rd, 2016

guy-wildenstein-in-paris-via-abcGuy Wildenstein’s tax evasion trial has begun in Paris, following several delays in the proceedings.  “At that time, there was no law” against the tax havens Wildenstein allegedly used, his lawyer, Herve Temime said in court. “There is therefore an absolute doubt on the very existence of unpaid taxes.”
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Bill Ruprecht Returns to Art World as Advisor in Online Venture

September 23rd, 2016

bill-ruprecht-via-wsjBill Ruprecht has returned to the art world, the WSJ reports, as he chairs the advisory board for the online art venture Invaluable.  “The art world is a hothouse, and I purposefully tried to get a little distance from it,” he told the paper, “but I keep getting drawn back in.”
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Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Museum Receives $42.5 Million Gift for Expansion Project

September 23rd, 2016

jeffrey-gundlach-via-bloombergInvestor Jeffrey Gundlach has made a $42.5 million gift to Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Museum, the largest in the museum’s 154-year history, for a planned expansion project.  “I learned about art by going to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery with my family,” Gundlach says. “It was the place that first opened my eyes and mind to the endless possibilities of art and showed me that Buffalo didn’t just have the potential for greatness, but actually had a museum that was world-class.”
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The Broad Museum Hits 820,000 Visitors in First Year

September 23rd, 2016

Broad Museum, via ArchdailyThe Broad Museum has drawn over 820,000 visitors in its first year of operation, according to a report issued by the museum.  “Edye and I could not be more delighted with the public reception to the museum,” Eli Broad says of the report. “Our goal has always been to share our art with the broadest possible public, and our first year has exceeded all of our expectations.”
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

London – Keith Sonnier: “Light Works” at Whitechapel Gallery Through September 11th, 2016

September 6th, 2016

Keith Sonnier, Ba-O- Ba VI (1970)
Keith Sonnier, Ba-O- Ba VI (1970), Copyright: Haeusler Contemporary Munich/Zurich Photograph: Wolfgang Stahl

Keith Sonnier‘s work has stood as a landmark voice in the development of abstract languages and explorations in the sculptural form, suspending neon lights over and across varied materials, from strips of cloth to reflective panes of glass, each time utilizing his materials’ internal consistencies to drive at nuanced explorations of light and space.  It should be telling then, that Whitechapel Gallery’s impressive exhibition focused on the artist takes up only three years of his career, examining his creative output from 1968 to 1970 as a foundational point in both his work, and the generation of artists around him. Read More »

Los Angeles – Ed Ruscha: “Books and Co.” and “Prints and Photographs” at Gagosian Gallery Through September 9th, 2016

September 5th, 2016

Ed Ruscha at Gagosian Gallery, via Art Observed
Ed Ruscha at Gagosian Gallery, via Art Observed

Few artists have left the sort of impact Ed Ruscha has left on the field of small-press and art book publishing over the course of their career.  Ruscha, whose almost constant output of small books of photography, prints and other printed matter, has consistently redefined both the material and conceptual practice of book manufacturing since the 1960’s.  His early pieces in this medium, executed during the 1960’s and 70’s, helped to redefine its practice, shifting the artist’s book from a limited-edition, rare item, to a mass-produced and widely distributed object that was seen as a step towards the democratization of art through its scalable production.

Ed Ruscha at Gagosian Gallery, via Art Observed
Ed Ruscha at Gagosian Gallery, via Art Observed

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New York — Vito Acconci: “Where We Are Now (Who Are We Anyway?), 1976″ at MoMA PS1 Through September 18th, 2016

September 4th, 2016

Vito Acconci, WHERE WE ARE NOW (WHO ARE WE ANYWAY?), 1976 (Installation View)
Vito Acconci, WHERE WE ARE NOW (WHO ARE WE ANYWAY?), 1976 (Installation View)

Continuing a consideration of its nearly half-century long history in New York City, MoMA PS1 is celebrating its fortieth anniversary with an exhibition dedicated to the early career of artist Vito Acconci, a pioneer of body and performance art in the United States during the 1960’s and 70’s that drove forward new concepts and perceptions of art practice while PS1 was similarly expanding the concept of the exhibition space.  WHERE WE ARE NOW (WHO ARE WE ANYWAY?), 1976 focuses on Acconci’s works from the late ‘60s and early ‘70s—the years that proceeded the opening of PS1 as an experimental, non-profit art center under the guidance of Alanna Heiss. Read More »

London – “The world is yours, as well as ours” at White Cube Through September 17th, 2016

September 3rd, 2016

Liu Wentao, Untitled (2015), via White Cube
Liu Wentao, Untitled (2015), via White Cube

Taking over the full two-floor layout of White Cube’s Mason’s Yard exhibition space, the gallery’s summer exhibition the world is yours, as well as ours explores the richly diverse and energetic forms of Chinese painterly abstraction, considering its format beyond facile classifications as a corollary to Western technique.  Delving into the cultural histories and forms of Chinese painting over the past centuries, White Cube presents the abstraction of China’s current crop of artists as a deeper engagement wth a range of practices between modernism and more traditional approaches to the painterly surface.  The show places Taoist thought at its base, exploring how the appreciation of abstract form in Chinese culture more broadly has left the door open for diverse experiences and engagements with the canvas in the modern era. Read More »

New York — A.R. Penck: “Early Works” at Michael Werner Gallery Through September 3rd, 2016

September 2nd, 2016

A.R. Penck, Elektrischer Stuhl (1960), all photos via Osman Can Yerebakan
A.R. Penck, Elektrischer Stuhl (1960), all photos via Osman Can Yerebakan

Climbing up the winding staircase of Michael Werner Gallery’s Upper East Side townhouse and entering the exhibition space, one is immediately faced with Elektrischer Stuhl (Electric Chair), a painting of a man being executed before a group of mourners.  The work, by Neo-Expressionist painter A.R. Penck, perhaps best embodies the artist’s combination of abrasive political gesture with his particular sense of aesthetic operation.  Early Works, on view at the gallery through September 3rd, outlines the body of Penck’s work in Dresden in the ‘60s and early ‘70s, when the influential artist suffered under the harsh social and political climate prevailing in East Germany.  It was during this period that the artist was the subject of an embargo by the government on his works, ultimately leading him to flee his hometown for Cologne, where he received a marked degree of critical and commercial acclaim.

A.R. Penck, Standart-Modell/CCCP-Studie (1972-73)
A.R. Penck, Standart-Modell/CCCP-Studie (1972-73) Read More »

Zürich – “Schwitters Miró Arp” at Hauser and Wirth Through September 18th, 2016

September 1st, 2016

Kurt Schwitters, Merzbild 1B Bild mit rotem Kreuz (Merzpicture 1 B Picture with Red Cross) (1919), via Hauser and Wirth
Kurt Schwitters, Merzbild 1B Bild mit rotem Kreuz (Merzpicture 1 B Picture with Red Cross) (1919), via Hauser and Wirth

Joining in the celebration of the Dada Movement’s 100th birthday this year in Zürich, Hauser and Wirth gallery has selected a premier group of works by on of the style’s prominent masters, bringing together works by Kurt Schwitters, and simultaneously placing them in conversation with pieces by Hans Arp and Joan Miró.  Examining the personal relationships and shared formal interests over the course of each artist’s work in the first half of the 20th Century, the exhibition is a fascinating blend of historical background and visual tour-de-force, bringing together a rare series of works through a less frequently explored series of connections.

Hans Arp, Geometrische Collage (Collage géometrique) (1918), via Hauser and Wirth
Hans Arp, Geometrische Collage (Collage géometrique) (1918), via Hauser and Wirth

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New York— Danny Lyon: “Message to the Future” at the Whitney through September 25th, 2016

August 31st, 2016

Danny Lyon, Crossing the Ohio River, Louisville, 1966 (1966)  		         via Whitney Museum of American Art
Danny Lyon, Crossing the Ohio River, Louisville, 1966 (1966), via Whitney Museum of American Art

Exhibited at a critical moment of heightened tensions regarding civil liberties in America, Danny Lyon’s retrospective exhibition transforms the Whitney’s fifth floor into a space for cultural reflection.  Set against a backdrop that confronts pertinent issues regarding violence, incarceration, and inequality, Lyon’s work chronicles a complex photographic history of the racial, social, and political issues that are currently challenging the United States anew in the 21st Century.  The serious tone of his work is met with the intimacy in which he engages with his subjects, offering a sense of hope while putting a deeply human face on subjects who are marginalized and oppressed. Read More »

New York – “Bad Faith” at James Fuentes Through September 11th, 2016

August 30th, 2016

Jessica Diamond, No Money Down, (1986 2016), via Art Observed
Jessica Diamond, No Money Down (1986/2016), via Art Observed

Taking the currently fraught political climate in the U.S. as a starting point for a deeper reflection on national and local history, James Fuentes’s summer group show offers a fitting cultural parallel in the early years of the 1980’s in New York City.  Charting the era’s conservative economic and foreign policies, the exhibition, curated by Andrew J. Greene & James Michael Shaeffer, brings together works by Nayland Blake, Jessica Diamond, Peter Halley and Robert Morris executed between 1982 and 1984.  Recording and critiquing a range of social and economic crises during the era, the show is a subtly resonant look at the deeper histories of cultural critique in the city, and the role artists have played in this process.

Peter Halley, Yellow Cell with Conduit (1982), via Art Observed
Peter Halley, Yellow Cell with Conduit (1982), via Art Observed

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New York — “The Language of Things” at City Hall Park Through September 29th, 2016

August 29th, 2016

Adam Pendleton, Untitled (code poem) (2016), via Public Art Fund
Adam Pendleton, Untitled (code poem) (2016), via Public Art Fund

The Public Art Fund’s The Language of Things, inspired by Walter Benjamin’s 1916 essay On Language as Such and on the Language of Man, takes on a challenging prompt this summer, seeking to communicate with the public through works that utilize language and linguistic themes in one of the most congested and sonically dense spaces in the city, just outside of City Hall downtown.  Benjamin’s assertion that “there is no event or thing in either animate or inanimate nature that does not in some way partake in language” further deepens this show’s proposed dialogue, looking at complexities of language as a utilitarian, communicative tool, to emphasize Benjamin’s conclusion that “it is in the nature of each one to to communicate its mental contents.” Read More »

New York – Cao Fei at MoMA PS1 Through August 30th, 2016

August 28th, 2016

Cao Fei, Whose Utopia (2006), via MoMA PS1
Cao Fei, Whose Utopia (2006), courtesy MoMA PS1

Currently on view at MoMA PS1, Cao Fei presents her first ever solo museum exhibition in the United States.  The artist’s practice, while rooted in video, performance and photography, takes on a sort of ever-shifting, fluid mode of inquiry into the modes of reality and fantasy in the 21st Century, underscoring human desire’s inextricable links with its economic and material bounds.  Presented here, the show’s slowly unfolding range of interests, from bizarre diorama work to her several year engagement with Second Life, to a series of intuitive and empathetic portraits of modern subcultures, traces the Chinese artist’s ability to navigate multiple modes of understanding and existence in the face of an increasingly mechanized modernity.

Cao Fei, RMB City: A Second Life City Planning (2007-2011), Courtesy MoMA PS1
Cao Fei, RMB City: A Second Life City Planning (2007-2011), Courtesy MoMA PS1

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