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J. Tomilson Hill Joins Guggenheim Foundation Board

March 20th, 2019

Collector J. Tomilson Hill has joined the board of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. “Tom is a skillful and deeply experienced leader in business and philanthropy, who will bring strategic insight and discerning guidance as a member of the Board,” said board chair William L. Mack and president Wendy Fisher in a joint statement. “Tom also is a founding member of the Guggenheim International Director’s Council, and he and his wife, Janine, are committed collectors and patrons of the arts. We look forward to working with Tom to advance the mission and vision of the Guggenheim.”
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Kehinde Wiley Launches Residency in Dakar, Senegal

March 20th, 2019

Kehinde Wiley has launched a residency in Dakar, Senegal, called Black Rock Senegal. “Black Rock Senegal came out of a direct need to engage Africa in a much more personal way,” he says. “After years of exploring the continent’s many cultures and countries I had a personal desire to create a workspace in West Africa. As an artist who works in the west I desired a space of renewal to explore new ideas and to create work outside of a western context—to create work within the context of my own lineage.”
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Brice Marden Gets Profile in NYT

March 20th, 2019

Artist Brice Marden gets the profile treatment in the NYT this week, as the artist recounts his battle with cancer and his working process throughout.  “I guess I was lucky,” he says. “I have been able to work through it all. It hasn’t made me hurry things up. It hasn’t made me work any differently. It’s just been an extra thing to think about.”


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J. Tomilson Hill Joins Guggenheim Foundation Board

March 20th, 2019

Collector J. Tomilson Hill has joined the board of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. “Tom is a skillful and deeply experienced leader in business and philanthropy, who will bring strategic insight and discerning guidance as a member of the Board,” said board chair William L. Mack and president Wendy Fisher in a joint statement. “Tom also is a founding member of the Guggenheim International Director’s Council, and he and his wife, Janine, are committed collectors and patrons of the arts. We look forward to working with Tom to advance the mission and vision of the Guggenheim.” Read More »

Kehinde Wiley Launches Residency in Dakar, Senegal

March 20th, 2019

Kehinde Wiley has launched a residency in Dakar, Senegal, called Black Rock Senegal. “Black Rock Senegal came out of a direct need to engage Africa in a much more personal way,” he says. “After years of exploring the continent’s many cultures and countries I had a personal desire to create a workspace in West Africa. As an artist who works in the west I desired a space of renewal to explore new ideas and to create work outside of a western context—to create work within the context of my own lineage.” Read More »

Brice Marden Gets Profile in NYT

March 20th, 2019

Artist Brice Marden gets the profile treatment in the NYT this week, as the artist recounts his battle with cancer and his working process throughout.  “I guess I was lucky,” he says. “I have been able to work through it all. It hasn’t made me hurry things up. It hasn’t made me work any differently. It’s just been an extra thing to think about.”

Read More »

Japanese Corporation Announces $1 Million Art Prize

March 20th, 2019

Japanese holding company Nomura Holdings, Inc. will launch the Nomura Art Award, a prize that will be given to “an artist who has created a body of work of major cultural significance,” a $1 million prize making it one of the largest in the world.  Read More »

U.S. Museums Failing to Considerably Diversify Artist Holdings and Exhibitions

March 20th, 2019

An ambitious study has found that US museums are failing to diversify the artists they exhibit, The Guardian reports.  “There have been some reactions that have said, ‘Oh, well, of course museum collections aren’t diverse. Of course they’re all dead white men.’ But you can’t say ‘of course’,” said Kevin M Murphy, Williams College’s senior curator of American and European art. “If you’re going to create a strategy around collecting, you really need to quantify where gaps are and where significant gaps are [as well as] think about your own community and those specific gaps, and build strategies from there.” Read More »

Trump Budget Pushes for Cuts to NEA

March 19th, 2019

For the third time, President Trump’s proposed annual budget has pushed to cut funding to the NEA. “The Administration believes audiences and aficionados are better than the Government at deciding what art is good or important,” the budget states. Read More »

City of Venice to Launch Official Arts District During Biennale

March 19th, 2019

At this year’s Venice Biennale, the island of Giudecca will launch an official Art District, including 11 art galleries and three national pavilions— Estonia, Iceland, and Nigeria. “The island of Giudecca has an incredible legacy as a platform for nurturing contemporary art and we are thrilled to placing all of its current galleries and future projects under one umbrella of Giudecca Art District,” says director Pierpaolo Scelsi. “We want to give Venice back to Venetians and art lovers around the world by creating one united art quarter that is a go-to destination for anyone visiting the city.” Read More »

Met Admission Fees Help Fund $2.8 Million for Local Arts Orgs

March 19th, 2019

Thanks in part to The Met’s new admissions fees, New York’s Department of Cultural Affairs has been able to earmark $2.8 million to 175 arts organizations throughout the city.  “This agreement has allowed the Met to thrive while giving us a unique opportunity to increase cultural investment in our underserved communities—allowing us to support the diversity that makes our city great at no additional cost to taxpayers,” Mayor Bill de Blasio says. Read More »

Sackler Trust Abandons $1.32 Million Donation to National Portrait Gallery

March 19th, 2019

Fearing protest, the Sackler Trust has abandoned a donation of $1.32 million to London’s National Portrait Gallery.  “It has become evident that recent reporting of allegations made against Sackler family members may cause this new donation to deflect the National Portrait Gallery from its important work,” a spokesperson says. “The allegations against family members are vigorously denied, but to avoid being a distraction for the NPG, we have decided not to proceed at this time with the donation. We continue to believe strongly in the gallery and the wonderful work it does.” Read More »

LACMA Combines Departments for European and American Art

March 18th, 2019

LACMA has collapsed two major departments into one this year, combining its American and European holdings into a single department as part of director Michael Govan’s plan to gradually arrive at a more fluid museum structure, LA Times reports.  Read More »

Lehmann Maupin to Open London Space

March 18th, 2019

Lehmann Maupin will open a new office and viewing room in London, with Isabella Kairis Icoz taking on the position of senior director. “Isabella is a longtime collaborator and important international perspective for the gallery,” says Rachel Lehmann. “She was key in identifying a London space which would suit our present needs, and where we will have the ability to showcase our program and explore a new phase of the business.” Read More »

TEFAF Sees Sale of $12 Million Renoir

March 18th, 2019

A $12.5 million Renoir sold at TEFAF this week, marking one of the fair’s major sales during a strong week.  The fair’s first VIP preview drew 5,000 visitors, with many more expected in the nine days to come. Read More »

Sotheby’s to Offer Monet Haystacks at May 14th Auction in NYC

March 15th, 2019

Sotheby’s will offer Claude Monet’s Meules from 1890 at its May 14th auction in New York, an impressive work carrying a $55 million estimate.  “It is a privilege to present one of Claude Monet’s defining Impressionist paintings in our Evening Sale this May,” says August Uribe, Sotheby’s head of Impressionist & Modern Art. “Monet’s Haystacks series has long served as an inspiration to countless artists since its creation in the early 1890s, and continues to inspire anyone who has viewed one of these canvases first hand.” Read More »

LA Times Charts Klaus Biesenbach’s Love of MOCA Grand’s Architecture

March 15th, 2019

The LA Times has a piece on Klaus Biesenbach’s love affair with the architecture of the MOCA. “Everyone said, ‘Do you like the building?’ ” he says of his first notes on the beauty of the building. “I said, ‘This is such an important piece of architecture, we need to let it shine.’ ” Read More »

Okwui Enwezor Dead at 55

March 15th, 2019

Curator Okwui Enwezor, the critically-precise, adventurous curator who up until recently served as the head of the Haus der Kunst in Germany, has passed away at the age of 55 after a long battle with cancer. “He was one of the leaders of, let’s call it, the free curatorial world—one of the people who believed in intelligence and scholarly research and passion and the power of the curatorial,” says Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, the director of the Castello di Rivoli in Turin, Italy, and curator of Documenta 13 in 2012.  Read More »

Art Newspaper Charts Cost of Government Shutdown

March 14th, 2019

The Art Newspaper charts the damage and financial cost of the recent government shutdown faced by federal museums and arts institutions. “I think that’s the biggest loss—the public-facing piece,” says Melissa Chiu, the director of the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Read More »

Frieze Sculpture Show Comes to Rockefeller Center

March 14th, 2019

The New York Times spotlights the upcoming Frieze New York sculpture show set to open next month at Rockefeller Center in the run-up to Frieze New York.  “The plaza gets half a million people through it every day,” says Loring Randolph, the artistic director of the Americas for Frieze Art Fairs. “There couldn’t be a better place for the artists to have better exposure.” Read More »

Joe Mantello and Stanley Whitney Sit Down in NYT Interview

March 14th, 2019

The NYT sits painter Stanley Whitney down with theater director Joe Mantello to discuss their respective arts and visions this week. “A signature style is a very odd thing now,” Whitney says. “It’s not something people really think is a good idea anymore. They feel it’s a limitation.” Read More »

Stolen and Recovered Willem de Kooning Painting to Be Sent for Restoration

March 14th, 2019

The New York Times reports on a Willem de Kooning work stolen in 1985 and recovered in 2017, stating that it will be shown off before being sent for restoration. “The F.B.I. has kept this an open case,” says Olivia Miller, the University of Arizona Museum of Art’s curator of exhibition. “The painting has been at the museum but it was still considered evidence, so it wasn’t allowed to leave until this past November.” Read More »

Art Newspaper Spotlights Recent Projects by Collector Budi Tek

March 13th, 2019

A piece in The Art Newspaper looks at recent moves by collector Budi Tek in Los Angeles, and asks if the collector might be branching out towards new exhibition ventures. The collector recently posted a photo of himself online looking at a raw space on Chongming Island.  Read More »

Curator Larry Ossei-Mensah Profiled in NYT

March 13th, 2019

Curator Larry Ossei-Mensah is profiled in the NYT this week, as he reflects on his current curatorial vision and interests in artists working today. “People who are looking to instigate a conversation that might not be in the mainstream, voices that might not always have a platform. Because I look at a lot of art all the time, I see a lot of shows, but then there are the things that stimulate me because it’s historic or an artist who is trying to break the form,” he says. Read More »

Artist’s Work Stolen from Desert X Show

March 13th, 2019

Artist Eric N. Mack has claimed that his work Halter (2019), a large-scale sculpture featuring patterned fabrics draped over a disused gas station near the Salton Sea for the Desert X show, has disappeared. “As I process the loss of this artwork that I and many others worked tirelessly to realize, I am only pacified by knowing that many visitors experienced and appreciated it as it was,” the artist said. “While the violence and hate enacted on this installation is astounding, I will not allow for this disregard to become a gesture that obstructs nor defines this work of art.” Read More »

NYT Looks at the Deep Holdings of Major Museums

March 12th, 2019

The New York Times has a piece this week on the ever-expanding holdings of major museums, and the experimentation with their collections that curators are undertaking.  “There is this inevitable march where you have to build more storage, more storage, more storage,” says Charles L. Venable, the director of the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields. “I don’t think it’s sustainable.” Read More »

Kara Walker to Create Next Tate Modern Turbine Hall Commission

March 12th, 2019

Kara Walker will create the Tate Modern’s next commission for its Turbine Hall, The Guardian reports.  “Kara Walker fearlessly tackles some of the most complex issues we face today,” says Frances Morris, the museum’s director. Her work addresses history and identity with a powerful directness, but also with great understanding, nuance and wit. Seeing her respond to the industrial scale of the Turbine Hall – and the wider context of London and British history – is a hugely exciting proposition.” Read More »