Global contemporary art events and news observed from New York City. Suggestion? Email us.
NEWS

Protest Takes Place on Met Steps

October 15th, 2019

A massive crowd of protestors descended on the steps of The Met yesterday, part of a protest against Columbus Day. “I want to remind you that this was not brought to you by the Met,”says Amin Husain, a member of Decolonize This Place. “This was brought to you by the comrades who came together to say Columbus Day is a sham.”
Read More »

Gavin Turk Profiled in The Guardian

October 15th, 2019

Gavin Turk gets a profile in The Guardian, discussing his recent activism and protest, and how he sees the art world unfolding in the face of climate crisis.   “Art is bound to get caught up in what’s happening in the wider world,” he says. 
Read More »

Nayland Blake Gives NYT Tour of Their Flatbush Apartment

October 15th, 2019

Nayland Blake gives the NYT a tour of their Flatbush apartment, showcasing work from fellow queer artists and the clutters of material and work that adorn their one bedroom space. “The only way that queer or marginalized cultures survive is through somebody loving them and somebody acting as the curator of their own museum,” Blake says. “That kind of intimate culture is just as valid as the high cultures that museums often traffic.”
Read More »

REFERENCE LIBRARY

Protest Takes Place on Met Steps

October 15th, 2019

A massive crowd of protestors descended on the steps of The Met yesterday, part of a protest against Columbus Day. “I want to remind you that this was not brought to you by the Met,”says Amin Husain, a member of Decolonize This Place. “This was brought to you by the comrades who came together to say Columbus Day is a sham.” Read More »

Gavin Turk Profiled in The Guardian

October 15th, 2019

Gavin Turk gets a profile in The Guardian, discussing his recent activism and protest, and how he sees the art world unfolding in the face of climate crisis.   “Art is bound to get caught up in what’s happening in the wider world,” he says.  Read More »

Nayland Blake Gives NYT Tour of Their Flatbush Apartment

October 15th, 2019

Nayland Blake gives the NYT a tour of their Flatbush apartment, showcasing work from fellow queer artists and the clutters of material and work that adorn their one bedroom space. “The only way that queer or marginalized cultures survive is through somebody loving them and somebody acting as the curator of their own museum,” Blake says. “That kind of intimate culture is just as valid as the high cultures that museums often traffic.” Read More »

Salvador Dali Print Stolen This Weekend from San Francisco Gallery

October 15th, 2019

A Salvador Dalí print valued at $20,000 was stolen from a San Francisco gallery this weekend. “He was in and out of there in a shot,” says Rasjad Hopkins, gallery director at Dennis Rae Fine Art, where the work was stolen.   Read More »

Eike Schmidt Reappointed to Uffizi After Cancelling Plans to Move to Vienna

October 14th, 2019

The Italian Culture Ministry has renewed Eike Schmidt’s contract as director of the Uffizi after he cancelled plans to take the helm at Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum at the last minute. Read More »

Hans Haacke Profiled in NYT

October 14th, 2019

Hans Haacke gets the profile treatment in the New York Times this week, as he prepares to mount a major retrospective at the New Museum. “To introduce something that deals with the social and political world that we live in — that was alien,” Haacke says of his early work. “Maybe I was naïve, but I did not expect that this would cause problems.” Read More »

U.S. Tariffs Ruling Could Affect Buyers of Prints and Lithographs

October 11th, 2019

A decision in a trade dispute between the US and the EU could cause a price hike for American buyers of photographs and prints. “Because the tariffs apply to lithographs and photographs printed in the last twenty years, they will also have a considerable impact on living artists, who rely on galleries as an important vehicle to sell their works and to foster cultural exchange,” a statement from the ADAA says. “Additionally problematic is the short time between the WTO’s decision and the tariffs’ enforcement, leaving small businesses little time to prepare and adapt.” Read More »

Cortauld Institute to Create New Teaching Posts for Contemporary African Art

October 11th, 2019

The Courtauld Institute of Art in London is creating two new permanent teaching posts in modern and contemporary art of Africa and the African diaspora, after a $750,000 grant in funding from the New York-based Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. “The grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation will help further develop the Courtauld’s robust research program that focuses attention on migration, diversity, and artists who have been marginalised by curricula and arts institutions,” the institute said in a statement. Read More »

David Zwirner Anticipates Over 100,000 Visitors for New Yayoi Kusama Show

October 11th, 2019

David Zwirner Gallery is expecting over 100,000 visitors to its show of new works by Yayoi Kusama, including a new Infinity Room by the artist. “Every time Kusama has a show, whether it’s in a museum or a gallery, attendance grows,” says senior partner Hanna Schouwink. “The interest in her work continues to grow. People always think, ‘If I come Tuesday, there won’t be lines.’ For sure, there will always be lines.” Read More »

Open Letter Calls for MoMA to Stop Relying on Financial Services from Private Prison System

October 11th, 2019

In an open letter published this week, over 220 artists, academics, and curators have asked MoMA and one of its trustees, Larry Fink, to stop relying on financial services that have stakes in private prisons. “We denounce MoMA’s connections to mass incarceration, global dispossession and climate catastrophe, and demand that MoMA’s Board member Larry Fink, CEO of BlackRock, divest from prison companies, the war machine and the destruction of the global environment,” the letter reads.  Read More »

Gagosian Gallery to Offer Works by Cindy Sherman and Catherine Opie as Jewelry

October 10th, 2019

Gagosian Gallery is offering a selection of works by Cindy Sherman and Catherine Opie as series of signet rings and brooches. “The project aligns a strong sense of tradition with the present through a unique, artisan sensibility,” says designer Liz Swig. “The beauty of the objects is powerful, but so is the meaning behind this project—a strong respect for both the old and the new.” Read More »

Mark Bradford Profiled in Washington Post

October 10th, 2019

Mark Bradford gets a profile in the Washington Post as part of its “Decade Influencers” section, reviewing his work and process. “There is improvisation,” he says of his deftly layering constructions, “but I know what I put under there. I keep exacting notes. Every time I put on a different piece of paper, I take a picture and it goes into my database. I know exactly what color I put on yesterday. So when I’m sanding, I know it’s a dark gray.” Read More »

Art Newspaper Profiles Theft of Caravaggio’s ‘Nativity’

October 10th, 2019

A piece in Art Newspaper this week looks at the theft of Caravaggio’s Nativity in 1969, and asks if police have been chasing red herrings and bad tips during their 50-year search for the work. Read More »

Artists Sound Off on their Visions for a New MoMA

October 10th, 2019

Art News asks a group of artists what they’d like to see in a renovated MoMA as the museum prepares to reopen. “I am curious to see what the new MoMA will do with the reimagined hanging of the permanent collection,” says Betty Tompkins. “I think of art history as a conversation between generations over time. I hope the new reimagined rooms have some aspect of that.” Read More »

François Pinault’s Bourse de Commerce to Open in June 2020

October 10th, 2019

François Pinault’s new, $170 million museum in the former Bourse de Commerce is scheduled to open in June 2020.  The space is anticipated to be a closely watched institution for contemporary art. Read More »

da Vinci’s ‘Vitruvian Man’ Barred from Travel to Paris After Court Ruling

October 9th, 2019

An Italian court has blocked the Gallerie dell’Accademia from lending da Vinci’s 1490 drawing Virtruvian Man, to the Louvre, saying the work is too fragile.  The announcement came after lobbying from Italia Nostra, a nonprofit group dedicated to protecting Italian artworks. Read More »

ICA Philadelphia Receives Anonymous $1.15 million Gift

October 9th, 2019

The ICA Philadelphia has received an anonymous gift of $1.15 million, which will be used to endow the position of director of public engagement. “ICA is extremely grateful to this anonymous donor for making such a visionary gift,” says interim director John McInerney. Read More »

Simone Leigh, Amy Sherald and Lorna Simpson Interviewed in NYT

October 9th, 2019

Artists Simone Leigh, Amy Sherald and Lorna Simpson are interviewed in the NYT this week, reviewing the expectations faced by black women in the art world and how they respond to these expectations in their work. “This is a moment, but I think this is also a moment that has been in the making,” Simpson says. Read More »

Keith Haring’s ‘Crack Is Wack’ Mural Nears Completion of Restoration

October 9th, 2019

Restoration of Keith Haring’s famed Crack is Wack is nearly complete at Harlem River Park. The piece has been restored multiple times since it was first painted in 1986. Read More »

Robert Mnuchin to Sell de Kooning Work for $25 to $35 Million at Sotheby’s New York

October 9th, 2019

Robert Mnuchin will sell a Willem de Kooning, at Sotheby’s next month in NYC, estimated at $25 million to $35 million. “This was one of the best from that period,” says dealer David Nash. “Now, 15 years later, they are extremely rare. They’ve been dispersed to private collections and museums.” Read More »

Aichi Triennial Reopens Controversial Mini-Exhibition

October 9th, 2019

The 2019 Aichi Triennale in Japan has reopened a controversial part of its presentation; “After ‘Freedom of Expression?’” which explored a history of censorship of artworks in the country. The closure was the result of works delving into the history of ianfu, or comfort women, who were forced into sexual slavery during World War II by the Imperial Japanese Army. Read More »

Desert X to Open Saudi Arabian Edition, Drawing Criticism

October 8th, 2019

The Desert X Art Biennial will open an edition in Saudi Arabia, leading to a number of board members leaving the organization. “Our mission has always been to create a platform for conversations around art and to welcome a multiplicity of voices,”Desert X founder and board President Susan Davis said in defense of the position. “Ultimately, it’s a way to have direct communication — artists to artists, artists to individuals, artists to the bigger audiences.” Read More »

Group of Artists and Writers Send ‘Letter of Concern’ to Swiss Institute Over Exhibiting Artist’s Domestic Violence Allegations

October 8th, 2019

A group of some artists and writers have signed a “Letter of Concern” to Swiss Institute, asking it to respond to pending domestic violence charges against exhibiting artist Tobias Madison.  “While a verdict has not yet been reached in court,” the letter reads, “we take these accusations seriously, and we believe a conversation about them must take place. How should we, as a community, address these kinds of troubling claims? We defer to you. Ignoring them is not the answer.” Read More »

Work Authenticated as Anthony van Dyck After Online Debate

October 8th, 2019

A 17th-century portrait of a Spanish royal family member has been confirmed as a piece by Anthony van Dyck, after online debate on the site Art UK pushed for a reconsideration of the work’s origins. “This Van Dyck discovery is an especially important one and unequivocally proves the value of this innovative use of digital technology to share and grow knowledge,” says Andrew Ellis, Art UK’s director. Read More »