Go See – London: “Corot to Monet: A Fresh Look at Landscape from the Collection” at The National Gallery through 20 September, 2009

August 6th, 2009

Corot to Monet National Gallery The beach at Trouville
The Beach at Trouville, Claude-Oscar Monet at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

It is in an attempt to embrace the traces of the artistic influences that played a part in the development of the Impressionism, that the National Gallery in London presents a show “Corot to Monet.”   The National Gallery relies almost entirely on its vast collection of 18th and 19th century French landscapes in order to chart and examine those influences while rediscovering the lesser known works that have led to the Impressionism.  The exhibition includes 90 paintings by artists like: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Pierre-Henri de Valenciennes, Simon Denis, Richard Parkes Bonington, Claude Oscar Monet, Narcisse Virgile Diaz, Camille Pissaro, Paul Huet, Thomas Jones, Andreas Schelfhout and others. The show closes 20 September, 2009.

Related Links:
Corot To Monet: Review
by Jonathan Jones [GuardianUK]
Corot to Monet: A Fresh Look at Landscape from the Collection [The National Gallery]
Corot to Monet at the National Gallery, Review [Telegraph]
See Corot to Monet in London [London]
Corot to Monet, National Gallery, London [The Independent]

Corot to Monet National Gallery London making Waves Claude Monet
Making Waves: Monet’s 1864 Coastal View “la Pointe de la Héve, Sainte-Adresse” at The National Gallery in London. Via The Independent

More pictures and text after the jump…

Corot to Monet Paul Huet Trees in the Park at saint-cloud National gallery
Trees in the Park at Saint-Cloud, Paul Huet at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

It is not surprising that an exhibition that almost aims to teach art history will draw quite a debate to its curatorial aspects.  Leaving concerns such as the order in which the paintings are hung or even the title of the show behind, one may question the very incentive of the usage of paintings as tools in an attempt to teach a lesson in art history.  Hence, the reviews prove to be contradictory, ranging from the celebration of an event that literally allows space for paintings that would otherwise be piled away under the dominance of works by more famous artists; to a negative view on the show, for it anchors the lesser known works into solely presenting their influences on giants of Art like Monet.  Richard Dorment writes: “By the end of the exhibition you’ve seen some amazing pictures, but you haven’t learned a thing“, while Jonathan Jones claims it to be “an exhibition to mull over and learn from.”

Corot to Monet National Gallery London Camille Pissaro The Avenue Syndenham
The Avenue, Syndenham, Camille Pissaro at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

Corot to Monet The national gallery View of the cascades at tivoli Simon Denis
View of the Cascades at Tivoli, Simon Denis at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

Corot to Monet National Gallery London Landscape with Cumulus Clouds Andreas Schelfhout
Landscape with Cumulus Clouds, Andreas Schelfhout at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

Corot to Monet the National Gallery London A Wall in Naples Thomas Jones
A Wall in Naples, Thomas Jones at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

Corot to Monet National Gallery London Italian Landscape François-Xavier Fabre
Italian landscape, François-Xavier Fabre at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

Corot to Monet National gallery London Sunset in the Roman Campagna Simon Denis
Sunset in the Roman Campagna, Simon Denis at The National Gallery in London. Via Guardian

Corot to Monet The National Gallery Bridge at Subiaco Jean-Antoine Constantin
Bridge at Subiaco, attributed to Jean-Antoine Constantin at The National gallery in London. Via Guardian

Corot to Monet National Gallery the Roman Campagna with the Claudian Aqueduct Jean Baptiste Camille Corot
the Roman campagna, with the Claudian Aqueduct, Jean Baptiste Camille Corot at the National Gallery in London. Via Artinfo