Archive for the 'Art News' Category

London – Nairy Baghramian: “Scruff of the Neck” at Marian Goodman Through July 29th, 2016

Monday, July 25th, 2016

Nairy Baghramian, Scruff of the Neck 1, via Marian Goodman
Nairy Baghramian, Scruff of the Neck (LR 30/31/32), All images via Marian Goodman Gallery

Now on view, Marian Goodman Gallery in London is presenting Scruff of the Neck, a series of site-responsive sculptures by artist Nairy Baghramian.   This is Baghramian’s first major solo show in London since The Walker’s Day Off at the Serpentine Gallery in 2010, and continues the Berlin-based Iranian artist’s practice in creating formally inventive sculptures that operate in both physiological and mechanical dimensions, articulating and reflecting the artist’s interest in exploring the space of the body in a non-habitual way. (more…)

New York – Jason Moran: “STAGED” at Luhring Augustine Through July 29th, 2016

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Jason Moran, STAGED Savoy Ballroom 1 (2015), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, STAGED: Savoy Ballroom 1 (2015), via Art Observed

In STAGED, on view at Luhring Augustine, artist and musician Jason Moran explores the history of jazz in America, in connection with explorations of the relationship between music, language and communication.    The show, on view at the gallery’s Bushwick location through the end of next week, marks his first solo exhibition, where his work as a musician is complimented by artworks and installations that reflect and expand upon his profound knowledge of jazz and jazz history.

Jason Moran, Run 4 (2016), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, Run 4 (2016), via Art Observed

Moran is best known as the MacArthur-winning jazz pianist and artistic director for jazz at the Kennedy Center.  In recent years, however, he has worked with visual artists like Theaster Gates, Glenn Ligon, Kara Walker, Stan Douglas and Adam Pendleton to expand his repertoire beyond the concert hall.  In 2015, Moran debuted sculptures and a series of works on paper at the Venice Biennale, works that now constitute part of STAGED, an ongoing project.

Moran Run 4 Right Hand
Jason Moran, Run 4, Right Hand (2016), via Luhring Augustine

Negotiating the limits of historical and artistic investigation, the show examines the forces of performance and process that drive at the cultural and social history of jazz, the mingling of physical locations and the immense talents that graced their stages, in conversation across decades. Moran has created two installations based on historic New York City jazz venues that are no longer in existence: the Savoy Ballroom (opened in Harlem in 1926, now known as an emblem of the swing era), and the Three Deuces (a comparatively modest venue located in midtown prominent from the 1930s-1950s). These installations present a mix of both mythical imagining and historically accurate representation of these spaces, in which so much of jazz history took place. Moran’s installations recreate the stages of these institutions sourced from photographs taken at the height of their popularity.  Over the course of the viewer’s time in the show, the piano will strike up into song, or voices will echo out from the Savoy’s ceiling, entering into a ghostly dialogue that transcends easy readings of time and space.

Jason Moran, The Temple (For Terry Adkins) (2016), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, The Temple (For Terry Adkins) (2016), via Art Observed

Jason Moran, Basin Street Runs 1 and 2 (2016), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, Basin Street Runs 1 and 2 (2016), via Art Observed

Memory and material residue feature prominently in this exhibition. Works are created by making runs on the piano with charcoal-covered fingers, or smearing the hands across piano rolls, as if the practice of musicianship was slurred across easy boundaries or notation, much in the way that Jazz so often upended the logical structure of early 20th Century music.  The smudges and flourishes of these works seem distinctly musical, as if the performative energy of the piece had been captured, a record of musical engagement that is charged with its musicality despite its purely material dimensions.

Jason Moran, STAGED: Three Deuces (2015), via Art Observed
Jason Moran, STAGED: Three Deuces (2015), via Art Observed

In STAGED, Moran resurrects the material of musical history and negotiates the traces it leaves behind. This exhibition represents a stunning example of the productive and fascinating ways in which history, memory, art and research can intersect.  Though it resists classification under the heading of contemporary art, the sculptural and visual dimension of Moran’s STAGED are striking examples of how the immateriality of music and history can be captured on paper and in space.

— A. Corrigan

Related Links:
Exhibition Page [Luhring Augustine]

 

Matthew Barney to Reprise 1991 Works from “Blind Perineum” at Gladstone

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Matthew-Barney-at-his-studio-in-New-YorkGladstone Gallery will reprise the sculpture and video of Matthew Barney’s 1991 performance Blind Perineum this fall, a piece in which the artist scaled across the ceiling of the space using ice picks.  “There are vast numbers of artists and other interested people who have heard about it but have never seen it,” Barbara Gladstone. “People think the performance was in front of an audience, but it never was.” (more…)

Rashid Johnson Appointed to Guggenheim Board

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Rashid JohnsonArtist Rashid Johnson has joined the board of the Guggenheim Museum, making him the first artist appointed to the position since the museum’s founding.  “The collective wisdom of the museum’s board will be considerably widened and deepened with Rashid Johnson’s joining,” says director Richard Armstrong.

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Kanye West to Perform at Watermill Center Benefit

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Kanye West, via NYTKanye West will give a guest performance at next week’s Watermill Center Benefit, an event to help fund the institution’s continued expansion and library construction.  “If we lose our history, we lose our memory,” artistic director Robert Wilson says. “So we try to have here some awareness of what happened in the past.” (more…)

Robert Irwin Profiled in W Magazine as He Opens Permanent Marfa Installation

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Robert Irwin, via WRobert Irwin is featured in W Magazine this week, as the artist prepares to open his new permanent installation in Marfa, subtly altering the frame of the Fort D.A. Russell hospital so that its walls and windows play on intersections of structural line and light.  “That’s the main event, all the windows. People think they’re looking for artwork but what they’re actually seeing is beautiful nature,” he says. “I liked the architecture of the fort. All I did was take that form and elaborate it—make the walls thicker, so you get a more substantial physicality to look out of. A real sense of frame.” (more…)

U.S. Government Files Lawsuit, Seizes van Gogh and Monet Works in Connection with Malaysian State Funds Disappearance

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, via ReutersThe U.S. government has filed lawsuits seeking to seize $1 billion in assets that it claims were diverted from the 1Malaysia Development Berhad fund by Malaysian government officials.  Among those named in the lawsuits are financier Jho Low, who recently made major purchases for works by Vincent van Gogh and Claude Monet, seized by Swiss officials on suspicion that they were purchased with the appropriated funds. (more…)

New London Mayor Seeks Plan to “Democratize” City’s Arts

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

London mayor Sadiq Khan, via StageLondon’s new mayor, Sadiq Khan, has announced plans to democratize the arts in the British capital, proposing a plan for a “Love London” card that will offer discounts and access to cultural events around the city.  “I don’t want Zone 1 to hog the best arts and culture in our city. There are 33 boroughs, I want to democratize the arts so that every Londoner can benefit from the world’s best art. Love London will give you a discount to enjoy that,” he says. (more…)

New York — “A Modest Proposal” at Hauser & Wirth Through July 29th, 2016

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Jakub Julian Ziolkowski, Untitled (2015) © the Artist Courtesy Hauser & Wirth
Jakub Julian Ziolkowski, Untitled (2015) © the Artist Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

A Modest Proposal, Hauser & Wirth’s summer exhibition curated by staff members Madeline Warren and Yuta Nakajima, adopts its eloquent title from Jonathan Swift’s namesake essay from 1729.  Recognized for being one of the foremost satirists in English language, Swift vigorously mocked Ireland’s political climate at the time through his sharp wit in various forms of writing—perhaps most famously in the show’s namesake essay, where the writer suggests the poor profit off of their children by selling them as food to the wealthy. (more…)

New York: “People Who Work Here” at David Zwirner Through August 5th, 2016

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

Colin O'Con, Magma Arch (2015), via Art Observed
Colin O’Con, Magma Arch (2015), via Art Observed

In 2012, David Zwirner Gallery launched a novel concept for the summer group show.  Called People Who Work Here, the gallery opened its floors to its own employees, launching an exhibition of works that underscored the depth of talent of those working for the international mega-gallery.  Four years later, the gallery has picked up where the last exhibition left off, opening a new iteration of the show that welcomes over 35 artists to show their work at the gallery’s 19th Street location, just steps away from a massive new Jeff Koons sculpture in the gallery’s open garage exhibition space.  Curated by Marina Gluckman and Jaime Schwartz in gallery’s Research and Exhibitions department, the show takes a playful look at the gallery’s skilled employee based, and offers subtle historical parallels with its own selection of artists.

Joel Fennell, Still-life (after McCobb) (2016), via Art Observed
Joel Fennell, Still-life (after McCobb) (2016), via Art Observed

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Detroit Institute of Arts Launches Commitment to African-American Art

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

DIA director Salvador Salort-Pons with a David Hammons work, via Detroit Free PressThe Detroit Institute of Arts as launched a multi-year commitment to deepen its holdings of African-American art, launching a new series of acquisitions, exhibitions, artist commissions, community partnerships, staff development and internships.  “We want to be the best,” says director Salvador Salort-Pons. (more…)

Art News Traces the History of 57th Street as a New York Art World Mainstay

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

The New York Gallery building, via Art NewsArt News takes an intriguing look at 57th Street, the original gallery district in New York, and its continued place in the New York art world.  “We have a lot of European artists we represent and I don’t think they were in love with Chelsea,” says Marian Goodman. “You see so many galleries in a row that you have to question the interest level [of visitors] after a while when they go to Chelsea. Very often they start to forget what gallery they’re in and what art they show.” (more…)

New York – “Empirical Intuitive Abstraction” Organized by Matthew Ronay at Andrea Rosen Through August 5th, 2016

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Empirical Intuitive Absorption (Installation View), via Art Observed
Empirical Intuitive Absorption (Installation View), via Art Observed

On paper, the list of artists for Andrea Rosen’s summer exhibition, Empirical Intuitive Absorption, may raise an eyebrow or two: Fernand Léger showing alongside Graham Marks, Matthew Ronay contrasted with Serge Charchoune, all underscored by Terry Riley’s swirling compositions.  Organized by Ronay, whose recent lecture at the Perez Museum in Miami inspired the exhibition, the show takes concepts of intuition and execution as two sides of the same coin, of the replication and creation of natural models through blind aesthetic representation. (more…)

Gagosian Gallery Agrees to Pay Over $4 Million in Back Taxes

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Larry Gagosian, via NYTGagosian Gallery has agreed to pay over $4 million in back taxes owed to New York State this week, the New York Times reports.  “Although we cannot comment on these findings, we accept and will fully comply with the terms of the settlement to bring closure to this matter,” the gallery said in a statement.   (more…)

Art Newspaper Reveals Real Name of Woman Who Received Van Gogh’s Ear

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Van Gogh, via Art NewspaperThe name of the woman who received Van Gogh’s ear in the mail has been revealed for the first time, the Art Newspaper reports.  Gabrielle Berlatier was the daughter of a farmer, and was working in a brothel when she encountered Van Gogh, who would later send her his ear when he cut it off.   (more…)

Christie’s Sees 29% Drop in Sales for First Half of 2016

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Christie's Showroom, via Art ObservedChristie’s sales figures for the first half of 2016 dropped to £2.1 billion ($3 billion), down 29 percent from last year’s landmark year.  “I think there are no surprises,” says president Jussi Pylkkanen. “Volumes are down, year on year, and obviously it’s a very significant reduction in just the amount of artworks that were being traded.” (more…)

Camille Henrot Interviewed in New York Times

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Camille Henrot, via NYTCamille Henrot is profiled in New York Times this week, as she opens a new show of work at Fondazione Memmo in Rome.  “Taking on fairly ambitious projects and producing a lot is a pace that suits me,” Henrot says. “When I was young, I was a little tortured by the fact that I couldn’t make all of the works that I had in my head. Today, I feel truly happy to have that freedom.” (more…)

Seventeen Corbusier Buildings Added to UNESCO World Heritage Site List

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Palace of Assembly, Chandigarh, via Art NewspaperSeventeen buildings by Le Corbusier have been named UNESCO World Heritage Sites this week, with the organization calling his work a “testimonial to the invention of a new architectural language that made a break with the past.”  The Complexe du Capitole in Chandigarh in India; the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo, Japan; and the House of Dr Curutchet in La Plata, Argentina are all included on the list. (more…)

Leslie Waddington’s Art Collection to Go On Sale at Christie’s This Fall in London

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Jean Dubuffet, via TelegraphThe £20 million private collection of late dealer Leslie Waddington is set for the auction blocks this fall at Christie’s in London, the Telegraph reports.  The sale includes landmark pieces by Jean Dubuffet, Alexander Calder, and Agnes Martin.   (more…)

Iranian Artist Permitted to Leave Country

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Parviz Tanavoli, via Art NewspaperPreviously detained, Iranian artist Parviz Tanavoli has been allowed to leave Iran for Vancouver, where he operates a studio.  “I am accused by the police,” Tanavoli says.  “The accusations are that my art is based on ‘spreading the falsehood’ and ‘creating public anxiety’. On 10 July I went to court with my lawyer and I was given the above allegations.” (more…)

MoMA Acquires Early Faith Ringgold Piece

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Faith Ringgold, American People Die, via Art NewsMoMA has acquired and hung an early Faith Ringgold piece from 1967 in its galleries, a searingly critical piece that echoes a renewed critical and institutional appreciation of her early career.    (more…)

Kimberly Drew Profiled in New Yorker

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Kimberly Drew, via New YorkerKimberly Drew, social media manager at The Met and founder of the popular Black Contemporary Art blog, is profiled in The New Yorker this week.  “I built the blog as a critique of the art world, and now it has a seat in that world,” she said. “There’s a lot of work I post that I don’t particularly like, but maybe it will resonate with someone else’s experience.” (more…)

New York – Sam Lewitt: “Less Light Warm Words” and Mathis Althmann: “Foul Matters” at Swiss Institute Through July 24th, 2016

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

Sam Lewitt, Less Light Warm Words (Installation View), via Art Observed
Sam Lewitt, Less Light Warm Words (Installation View), via Art Observed

The news that Swiss Institute would leave its location at 18 Wooster this summer joined a slow but steady list of high-profile departures from SoHo that included Artist’s Space and other longtime residents of the neighborhood.  With this movement from its home soon to be underway, Swiss Institute has turned its attention to a pair of exhibitions dealing with concepts of the institution, infrastructure, and urban locales as it takes its final bow in the space.  Giving the space upstairs over to artist Sam Lewitt’s installation Less Light Warm Words, while German artist Mathis Altmann takes over the gallery’s basement exhibition space, filling it with a bizarre series of pieces that mix the abject with the structural.

Mathis Altmann, Untitled (2016)
Mathis Altmann, Untitled (2016)

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New York – Asger Jorn: “The Open Hide” at Petzel Gallery Through July 29th, 2016

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

Asger Jorn, Portrait of Odilon Redon (1958), via Art Observed
Asger Jorn, Portrait of Odilon Redon (1958), via Art Observed

Despite a remarkably expressive hand and a pioneering range of styles, Asger Jorn’s work has long been somewhat under-appreciated in the United States. The Danish artist and COBRA co-founder’s work ranges across a broad series of compositional techniques and practices that defined him as a founding voice of post-war abstraction, yet his reputation seems almost underemphasized by comparison to his stature in Europe.  It’s this contrast that makes his show currently on view at Petzel Gallery feel like such a well-kept secret, a balanced, well-organized exhibition that spans a wide range of the artist’s practice.  (more…)