Archive for the 'Art News' Category

Adam Pendleton Profiled in NYT

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

Adam Pendleton, via NYTAdam Pendleton is the subject of a profile in the New York Times this week, as the artist reflects on his early work, and his ideas on finding one’s voice as an artist.  “I began thinking very deeply about what it meant to create space for yourself as an artist from an art historical standpoint,” he said of his decision to move to the Hudson Valley in 2007. “But also, what ideas can you contribute to the world as an artist that matter.” (more…)

UK’s BP Portrait Award Finalists Announced

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

Thomas Ehretsmann, via GuardianThe finalists for the UK’s annual BP Portrait Award have been announced, with works by Thomas EhretsmannBenjamin Sullivan, and Antony Williams making the final list.  “I am delighted with this year’s shortlist and the final selection of works for the exhibition,” says Nicholas Cullinan, the director of the UK’s National Portrait Gallery, “all of which provoked an immediate response from the judges – whether that be a reaction to the skill displayed by a particular artist or a more visceral connection with the sitter, subject matter or the mood conveyed.” (more…)

Sprüth Magers to Represent Estate of Otto Piene

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

Otto Piene, via Sperone WestwaterSprüth Magers has announced that it will represent the estate of artist Otto Piene, founder of the ZERO group.  The gallery will mount an exhibition of his work in the coming weeks at its Berlin space, and will unveil a major work by the artist at Art Basel this summer. (more…)

William Kentridge Opening New Exhibition Space in Johannesburg Built on Encouraging Experimentation and Failure

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

William Kentridge, via Art NewspaperArtist William Kentridge is opening a new exhibition space in Johannesburg called the Centre for the Less Good Idea, and intended as a “safe space for uncertainty, doubt, stupidity and, at times, failure,” the Art Newspaper reports.  The exhibition program is designed to sidestep demands for efficiency and effectiveness often seen in the language of NGOs funding art projects in the country. (more…)

Richard Long Profiled in The Guardian

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

Richard Long, via Art NewspaperArtist Richard Long is profiled in The Guardian this week, as the artist prepares to open an exhibition at Houghton Hall reviewing a number of his ambitious land art pieces.  “All these coincidences are part of the natural way of things, aren’t they?” he says of his early work.  “When I made my straight line, I didn’t know about the other straight lines – the famous Nazca Lines in Peru, or Alfred Watkins, who wrote The Old Straight Track.”  (more…)

New York Mag Dives into Met Financial Struggles

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Met, via NYTNew York Magazine profiles the financial struggles at The Met, recapping the varied financial problems that led to the ouster of Thomas Campbell earlier this year.  “If the Met had been flush,” said one museum expert says, “I don’t think we’d be talking about Tom Campbell today.” (more…)

Sharon Lockhart’s Work for Venice Biennale Profiled in Art Newspaper

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Sharon Lockhart, via Art NewspaperThe Art Newspaper profiles artist Sharon Lockhart’s work for the Venice Biennale, offering a voice to Jewish and Polish orphans through a series of publications and visual works.  “The last few years have been very emotional for me—I take a lot of what’s going on with the girls home with me. But I’ve begun realizing I can’t do all of this alone, and I want to make the education program more sustainable,” Lockhart says. (more…)

W Magazine Spotlights Art-Focused Films at TriBeCa Film Festival

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Julian Schnabel - The Walk Home - (1985) - via Elise Gallant for Art ObservedW Magazine has a spotlight on a series of art-focused and artist-directed films at the TriBeCa Film Festival, including Laurie Simmons’s full-length directorial debut, and a documentary on artist Julian Schnabel.   (more…)

Gillian Wearing to Become First Woman to Create Sculpture for Parliament Square

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Gillian Wearing, via The GuardianArtist Gillian Wearing will be the first female to create a sculpture for London’s Parliament Square, The Guardian reports.  Wearing will honor suffragist Millicent Fawcett with a statue.  “Millicent Fawcett was an incredible woman and by honoring her in Parliament Square I believe she will continue to inspire generations to come,” Wearing says. (more…)

Kara Walker Profiled in New York Magazine

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Kara Walker, via The GuardianKara Walker is the subject of a lengthy profile in New York Magazine this month, discussing her recent work, her monumental 2014 sculpture A Subtlety, and its reception.  “I am still wrestling with my relationship to what my art might do in the public space,” Walker says. “How I can control it.” (more…)

Auguste Rodin’s Centenary Brings New Exhibitions, Market Adjustments

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Rodin in the studio, via NYTThe New York Times profiles the centenary of Auguste Rodin’s death, and the current exhibitions spotlighting new discoveries and research on the artist’s life and work, including newly discovered sculptures and models for his works, not to mention recent appreciation of his works on the auction market.  “The reason the Rodin market hasn’t gone through the roof is that he produced a lot,” sasy Jérôme Le Blay, a founding member of the Auguste Rodin Committee in Paris.  “He organized his estate to keep casting his works.  The market is divided into segments, and each one is understandable according to rarity value.” (more…)

Painter David Salle Profiles Wichita Art Community Where He Honed his Craft

Monday, April 17th, 2017

David Salle, via NYTPainter David Salle is featured in the New York Times this month, as he returns home to Wichita, Kansas, and reflects on the small arts community where he first found his voice, watched over by artists Bill and Betty Dickerson.  “The Dickersons and their teaching style flourished at a time, mostly before the triumph of Abstract Expressionism and the rise of the university art department, when a lot of major American art was regional,” Salle says.  “Good art occurred wherever an artist happened to be, from Maine to Taos. Whatever its new incarnation, the school I had known, its distinctive personality and unlikely influence, could never be repeated.” (more…)

Mat Collishaw to Create VR Installation of World’s First Photography Exhibition

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Early photo by William Henry Fox Talbot, via The GuardianArtist Mat Collishaw is preparing an exhibition for Somerset House in London, re-creating the world’s first photography exhibition from 1839 in virtual reality.  “VR still feels like an unknown and that makes it really compelling,” Collishaw says said. “I think it’s going to have a similar impact on art as photography did, which is why I’ve chosen this specific moment to explore through VR. That show changed how we viewed images for ever and I think VR will bring about the same kind of shift.” (more…)

Lilly Chan Leaving Christie’s for Phillips as Managing Director for Asia

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Lilly Chan, via ArtforumLilly Chan, Christie’s global managing director for Asian art, has left the company to join Phillips as managing director of Asia.  “The importance of Asia to our overall international growth strategy cannot be overstated,” says Phillips CEO Edward Dolman.  “A foremost priority for us has been to strengthen our presence in Asia and build relationships with collectors across the region—and a critical component in this ambitious plan is the appointment of an experienced managing director such as Lilly. I look forward to working with her and our entire Asian team to build our reputation as the most innovative auction house in the region.” (more…)

Chris Ofili Discusses Life in Trinidad with The Guardian

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Chris Ofili, via The GuardianChris Ofili is profiled in The Guardian this week, as the artist reflects on his recent work, and his move to Trinidad.  “Moving to Trinidad was a great experiment,” Ofili says. “I never knew what it would do to my work. Or even if it would be accepted by people, and not be seen as me just falling off the edge of the earth.” (more…)

Berlin-“Fat City” by Marianne Vitale at Contemporary Fine Arts through April 22nd, 2017

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Marianne Vitale, Fat City (Installation View), via CFA
Marianne Vitale, Fat City (Installation View), via CFA

Now through April 22, the Contemporary Fine Arts Gallery in Berlin presents Fat City, a show of works by New York-based artist Marianne Vitale.  For her second exhibition at CFA, Vitale has constructed a series of sculptures that reflect critically and ironically upon American identity, industry, and the concept of the American Dream.  The title of the exhibition takes its name from a 1969 Leonard Gardner novel, in which the protagonist, an alcoholic and semi-retired boxer, drifts down the streets of Stockton, California encountering the melancholy sights of American progress along the way.  In Vitale’s work, symbols of a particularly nostalgic America (such as boxing and steel) appear in the gallery, and speak to the fictional, narrative quality of this national identity.  (more…)

Germany Investigating Thefts of East German Art Works by Stasi During Cold War

Saturday, April 15th, 2017

Berlin Wall Construction, via Art NewspaperThe German state has announced that it will be investigating mass plunder of art works by the East German secret police during the Cold War, the Art Newspaper reports.  “It is important to remember that this is a Germany-wide problem,” says Uwe Schneede, an honorary executive board member of the German Lost Art Foundation.  (more…)

National Portrait Gallery Acquires Tracey Emin’s ‘Death Mask’

Saturday, April 15th, 2017

Tracey Emin, via The GuardianThe British National Portrait Gallery has purchased Tracey Emin’s Death Mask, a bronze cast of the artist’s face made in 2002. “Drawing on the history of this very particular form of portraiture, Tracey Emin has taken the idea of the death mask to create an innovative work that challenges our perceptions of self-portraiture,” says director Nicholas Cullinan. (more…)

Adrián Vilar Rojas’s Met Rooftop Commission Profiled in NYT

Saturday, April 15th, 2017

Adrian Vilar Rojas, via NYTThe New York Times profiles Adrián Vilar Rojas’s installation on the rooftop of the Met, which opens this week, and features a bacchanalian reinterpretation of objects from the Met’s collection.  “In some way or another, I wanted to play with the doodles of culture,” he says. (more…)

New York – Jeremy Moon at Luhring Augustine Through April 15th, 2017

Saturday, April 15th, 2017

Jeremy Moon, Signals (1967), via Art Observed
Jeremy Moon, Signals (1967), via Art Observed

Artist Jeremy Moon had worked for a little over a decade when his life was tragically cut short by a motorcycle accident in 1973.  Yet the artist’s work during this short period, the subject of an exhibition at Luhring Augustine’s Bushwick location this month, offers a striking fusion of the era’s painterly and conceptual thematics, combining serialism, minimalism, shaped-canvas painting, colorfield painting and abstraction into a colorful and often commanding body of work.  The gallery, which recently announced its representation of Moon’s estate, presents an introduction of a practice that stands out for both its stylish fusion of techniques with a precise sense of both critical discourse and practiced technique. (more…)

Dubai Art Market Continues to Grow

Friday, April 14th, 2017

Mohammed Afkhami, via CNNCNN notes a recent uptick in the Dubai art market of late, as sales continue to rise and a number of new buyers enter the fray.  “The art scene is thriving in the Middle East,” says collector Mohammed Afkhami. “I sense a regional sense of pride when art from the region is discussed and the level of coverage in traditional and social media is making people more aware.” (more…)

Randy Kennedy Leaving New York Times to Direct Special Projects for Hauser & Wirth

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

ALSNew York Times art reporter Randy Kennedy is joining Hauser & Wirth as director of special projects.  Kennedy will “helm a number of new editorial, writing, and documentary initiatives for web and print, including relaunching and expanding the gallery’s magazine Volume, for which he will serve as editor-in-chief,” the gallery said in a statement. (more…)

Wall Street “Charging Bull” Sculptor Calls for Removal of “Fearless Girl” Advertisement

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

DiModica and Siegel, via The GuardianArturo DiModica, the sculptor behind the famous “Charging Bull” statue in downtown Manhattan, is asking the city to remove the “Fearless Girl” statue placed in front of the bull as part of an ad campaign for State Street Global Advisors.  The new statue has become something of a phenomenon in recent weeks, with tourists clamoring to take photos and pose with it, all to the dismay of Mr. DiModica, who claims the new piece appropriates his original sculpture.  “The Charging Bull no longer carries a positive, optimistic message. Rather, it has been transformed into a negative force and a threat,” says Di Modica’s attorney, Norman Siegel. “Clearly, a deliberate choice was made to exploit and to appropriate the ‘Charging Bull’ through the placement of the ‘Fearless Girl’.” (more…)

Carolee Schneeman to Receive Golden Lion for Career Achievement in Venice

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

Carolee Schneeman, via ArtforumArtist Carolee Schneeman has been awarded the Venice Biennale Career Golden Lion award, recognizing her contributions to the field over the course of her career.  “Schneemann has been one of the most important figures in the development of performance and body art,” curator Christine Macel said in a statement. “She uses her own body as the prevalent material of her art. In so doing, she situates women as both the creator and an active part of the creation itself.” (more…)