Archive for the 'Art News' Category

Prix Marcel Duchamp Shortlist Announced

Saturday, January 12th, 2019

Marguerite Humeau, via Art NewsThe Prix Marcel Duchamp, the annual French award that carries a €35,000 purse, has revealed its shortlist for 2019, with a winner to be announced at the Centre Pompidou in Paris in October.  Nominees include Eric BaudelaireKatinka Bock, Marguerite Humeau, and Ida Tursic & Wilfried Mille. (more…)

New Museum Staff Takes Steps to Unionize

Saturday, January 12th, 2019

New Museum, via Art NewsNew Museum staff is making efforts to unionize, making the move public after several months of planning and deliberation. “Forming a union will enable us, as well as future New Museum employees, to effectively advocate for changes in staff conditions that will make the New Museum a stronger and more sustainable institution,” the group said in a statement. “We believe in the New Museum and its mission; we want it to succeed. But we also recognize a need for critical changes at this moment in the museum’s growth.” (more…)

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac Taps Kyu Jin Hwang for Associate Director for Asia

Saturday, January 12th, 2019

Kyu Jin Hwang, via Art NewsGalerie Thaddaeus Ropac has appointed Kyu Jin Hwang as its associate director for Asia, part of gallery plans to more aggressively target Asian collectors.  “I am absolutely delighted to join Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, whose team I had the pleasure of working with in my previous roles, having been drawn to the outstanding artists represented by the gallery,” Hwang said in a statement. (more…)

New York – James Welling: “Transform” at David Zwirner Through February 16th, 2018

Friday, January 11th, 2019

James Welling, Chemical (2018), via David Zwirner
James Welling, Chemical (2018), via David Zwirner

Over the course of the last decade, photographer James Welling has branched out into a series of more experimental modes of image production, often welcoming degrees of abstraction and indeterminacy into the creation of his photographic images.  Using unorthodox photographic procedures in conjunction with varied processes that see his works moving between abstraction and representation, his recent series of work are emblematic of the breadth of his ongoing experimentation with the conventions and materials of photography. (more…)

Joan Mitchell Foundation Announces 2019 Residencies

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

Gus Bennett, via Art NewsThe Joan Mitchell Foundation has announced its 2019 artist residencies in New Orleans, where each participant will receive a private studio space as well as access to programming at the center. “We look forward to engaging with our artists-in-residence and to seeing the exciting and unexpected ways the space and time can impact their work,” says Foundation CEO Christa Blatchford.  (more…)

Andy Warhol Foundation to Give $100,000 to Smithsonian, Ending Ban

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

US Customs HouseThe Andy Warhol Foundation will give $100,000 to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian for a traveling Oscar Howe retrospective, ending an eight-year funding ban originally installed after the Smithsonian removed a David Wojnarowicz work from a show in 2010.  “We believe that the ban has had its intended effect of promoting freedom of artistic expression at the national level,” says Foundation head Joel Wachs. “The Smithsonian has also demonstrated a strong track record of highlighting underrepresented artists over the past eight years, which aligns well with the foundation’s core values. While Wojnarowicz and Howe were very different artists working in different circumstances, both fiercely advocated for the visibility and inclusion of marginalized perspectives in contemporary art discourse.” (more…)

UK’s National Gallery to Loan Works to Japan for Olympics

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

Vincent Van Gogh, via Art NewspaperLondon’s National Gallery will send Van Gogh’s Sunflowers and 60 other paintings on a tour of two Japanese Museums next year in celebration of the Tokyo Olympics. “By sharing the treasures from our world-leading museums and galleries, we can promote the very best of Britain to the globe,” says Jeremy Wright, the UK’s Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. (more…)

Richard Deacon: “House & Garden” at Marian Goodman Through February 16th

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

Richard Deacon, House & Garden (Installation View), via Marian Goodman
Richard Deacon, House & Garden (Installation View), via Marian Goodman

Drawing together a body of new photographs, ceramics and sculpture from the past year of artist Richard Deacon’s ever-evolving studio practice, the current solo show at Marian Goodman Gallery, House & Garden, explores relationships between materials and processes, representing innovations in Deacon’s thinking about sculpture, and the relationships of image to surface, object making to the pictorial, and sculpture to the plinth, all notions that have been present in his work and are at the nexus of his steadfast interest in a multiplicity of modes of production. (more…)

Kehinde Wiley Interviewed in The Guardian

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

Kehinde Wiley, via The GuardianKehinde Wiley is profiled in The Guardian this week, as he reflects on his recent work and the impact of his creative project. “The great heroic, often white, male hero dominates the picture plane and becomes larger than life, historic and significant,” he says. “That great historic storytelling of myth-making or propaganda is something we inherit as artists. I wanted to be able to weaponize and translate it into a means of celebrating female presence.” (more…)

Met Achieves Record Attendance Figures for 2018

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

Met Museum, via NYtThe Met achieved record attendance last year, up 5% to 7.36 million visitors, despite challenges the museum faced over its new admission policy.  “Surprisingly, when we made this change, New Yorkers recognized that the Met needed to shore up its revenues to stay healthy, and they increased the amount of money they contribute on each visit,” said Daniel Weiss, chief executive of the museum. (more…)

The Shed to Open April 5th

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

The Shed, via NYTNew York’s anticipated exhibition and performance space The Shed finally has an opening date: April 5th. “We wanted this to be a building that could bring parity across pretty much all art forms,” says Alex Poots, the Shed’s artistic director and chief executive. (more…)

Anton Shagalov Sues New York’s Paul Kasmin Over Frank Stella Painting

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

Anatole Shagalov, via Art NewspaperThe art dealer Anatole Shagalov is suing New York’s Paul Kasmin Gallery for $8.5 million in damages over the sale of Frank Stella’s La Scienza della Fiacca, of which Shagalov alleges the gallery claimed partial ownership. “The lawsuit will allege that when Paul Kasmin Gallery falsely claimed to own an interest in Shagalov’s painting, it knowingly defamed Shagalov, it negatively impacted the value of the painting itself by baselessly casting doubt on its title, and it interfered with Shagalov’s contractual relations with a key lender,” the dealer’s lawyers said in a statement.  (more…)

Mary Boone’s Lawyers Cite Trauma in Bid to Avoid Prison

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

Mary Boone, via NYtLawyers for dealer Mary Boone, the veteran art dealer facing potential prison time for tax evasion have asked that the judge grant leniency based on her traumatic childhood. “Behind the facade of success and strength lies a fragile and, at times, broken individual,” the lawyers wrote in the filing. (more…)

British Museum Plans Ambitious Munch Prints Show

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Munch Print, via Art NewspaperThe British Museum is planning a major retrospective of the print works of Edvard Munch, Art Newspaper reports, making it the UK’s largest exhibition of Munch prints for nearly 50 years. The show will be held in collaboration with the Munch Museum in Oslo, Norway. (more…)

Da Vinci Paintings Blocked for Export by Italian Government

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Leonardo da Vinci's The Annunciation, via Art NewspaperThe Italian Government will block a loan of works by Leonardo da Vinci to the Louvre for an exhibition dedicated to the artist, underscoring the government’s populist turn. “Leonardo is Italian; he only died in France, says Lucia Borgonzoni, the undersecretary for the Italian ministry of culture. “Giving the Louvre all those paintings would mean putting Italy on the margins of a great cultural event.” (more…)

US Supreme Court Won’t Hear Case Over Art Repatriation in Hungary

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Collection of Baron Mor HerzogThe US Supreme Court will not hear a case over the return of paintings from the Hungarian Government seized during World War II. The family of Baron Mor Lipot Herzog will continue to pursue a case in the United States against three museums and a university in the country. (more…)

Artadia Partners with Marciano Art Foundation on LA Art Award

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Olivia Marciano, via Art NewsArtadia and the Marciano Art Foundation will join together for the Marciano Artadia Award, a $25,000 annual prize for a Los Angeles–based artist.  “Artadia is thrilled to partner with the Marciano Art Foundation. We share a common goal of supporting the diverse Los Angeles artistic ecosystem,” Artadia’s executive director, Carolyn Ramo says. “As L.A. increasingly becomes a city for artists, we are pleased to be recognizing and providing vital funds and validation to the talent found here.” (more…)

Miami’s Aventura Mall Builds Its Impressive Art Collection

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Carsten Höller's Aventura Slide Tower, via Architectural DigestThe Architectural Digest this week profiles the recent push by Miami’s Aventura Mall to become a major site to view art, with works by Lawrence Weiner and Carsten Höller on view . “We feel we’ve invested wisely,” real-estate developer Jackie Soffer says of the property’s collection.  (more…)

Prado Museum Turns 200

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Prado Museum, via Art NewspaperAs it celebrates its 200th Birthday this year, Madrid’s Prado Museum and director Miguel Falomir Faus look back on the history and mandate of the institution this week in Art Newspaper, particularly in the years before it earned a degree of autonomy from the Spanish state. “The Prado was sometimes a weapon,” Falomir says, “used by one political party against the other” (more…)

Sean Kelly Adds New Parters

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Sean Kelly Partners, via Art NewsSean Kelly Gallery in New York has added four new partners; Cecile Panzieri as senior partner and Janine Cirincione, Lauren Kelly and Thomas Kelly (the latter two are his children) as partners. “I’ve built the business to the point where I felt it was a good idea to bring partners in who have a vested interest in furthering the business,” Kelly himself said in a statement. “Two of the newly appointed partners are my children, but all of them are my professional family. I could not be more proud to have such distinguished Partners.” (more…)

London – Robert Rauscheberg: “Spreads 1975-83” at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac Through January was 26th, 2019

Monday, January 7th, 2019

Robert Rauschenberg, Palladian Xmas (Spread) (1980), via Ropac
Robert Rauschenberg, Palladian Xmas (Spread) (1980), via Ropac

Over the course of his career, Robert Rauschenberg occupied an almost innumerable series of critical and theoretical positions in the practice and production of art objects, often bounding from material to material and technique to technique in bounds that often moved beyond the scope of any single artists entire oeuvre.  His relentless interest in particular with the picture plane itself, and its capacity for interruption or disruption through the inclusion of ready-made objects, collaged pieces and even the scraps of other paintings, Rauschenberg produced what could best be considered as a career in a constant state of flux caused by its own movements.Robert Rauschenberg, Rodeo Palace (Spread) (1976), via Rauschenberg Foundation
Robert Rauschenberg, Rodeo Palace (Spread) (1976), via Rauschenberg Foundation

This winter, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac in London is presenting the artist’s iconic Spreads series, reflecting on the artist’s work pioneering new ways of painterly construction while remaining focused on his own painterly language.  The large-scale Spreads encapsulate many of Robert Rauschenberg’s best-known motifs and materials, and the twelve works from the series―the largest of which stretches to over six metres wide are presented alongside a series of paper collages from the same era.  In the Spreads the artist’s familiar motifs from his object-laden Combines is reprised, incorporating car tires, doors, bedding and other materials in conjunction with fabric materials and canvas, all conspiring to create a dense, multilayered series of materials that challenges and reframes the canvas as a collecting pool for both materials and ideas, reference systems and the objects that contain them, all negotiating within the canvas as one potential conclusion of the project of the 20th Century avant-garde.Robert Rauschenberg, Rumor (Spread) (1980), via Ropac
Robert Rauschenberg, Rumor (Spread) (1980), via Ropac

Rauschenberg himself was well aware of these conversations of object and image, referring to the “Spreads” as both a negotiation of history and “something you put on toast.”  The language of his materials laid across the canvas negotiate with their mode of presentation, ultimately creating even more dense linguistic networks alongside the concepts explored within the works themselves.  Rather than a purely retrospective exercise, the development of his Spreads is also suggestive of a more complex relationship between past and present, integrating not only elements from his earlier work but also reflecting changes in his life, his practice and in contemporary art at the time. Rauschenberg’s use of fabric color blocks in his Spreads not only represented a shift in his color palette from the urban experience of New York to the bright oranges, pinks and yellows of life in Florida, but also engaged with recent artistic developments such as Color Field painting and Minimalism, incorporating references to a new generation of artists.

Robert Rauschenberg, Spreads 1975-1983 (Installation View), via Ropac
Robert Rauschenberg, Spreads 1975-1983 (Installation View), via Ropac

This series of works, a vast trove of historical touchstones and concepts united by Rauschenberg’s hand, makes for a striking investigation of the artists’s work, and his vantage point from the vanguard of 20th Century art.

The show closes Janaury 26th.

— D. Creahan

Read more:
Thaddaeus Ropac [Exhibition Site]

Guardian Profiles Artist Following Footsteps of JMW Turner Through Areas Ravaged by Climate Change

Monday, January 7th, 2019

Emma Stibbon, via The GuardianThe Guardian profiles a recent project by artist Emma Stibbon, whose work documents the results of climate change on landscapes previously depicted by famed landscape artists like JMW Turner. “When we think of the Alps,” she says, “we think of iconic white peaks. By the end of this century, there probably won’t be any snow.” (more…)

Musée D’Orsay Closes Early After Yellow Vest Protests

Monday, January 7th, 2019

Musee D'Orsay, via Art NewsA protest in Paris by the Yellow Vests group led the Musée d’Orsay to close early on Saturday, Art News reports. The closures were caused by fierce clashes between protestors and police, which threatened passerby and visitors to the museum. (more…)

Stedelijk and Beatrix Ruf Reach Amicable Agreement to “Leave Past Behind”

Monday, January 7th, 2019

Beatrix Ruf, via Art NewsThe Stedelijk Museum has issued a cryptic statement that it had come to an agreement with former director Beatrix Ruf “to leave the past behind.” Ruf will not return to her position, but “may however, be invited to be involved in a specific exhibition or in other museum projects, under the responsibility of a future, as yet unappointed, artistic director.” (more…)