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Brad Troemel Profiled in New Yorker

January 23rd, 2017

Brad Troemel, via New YorkerBrad Troemel is the subject of a profile in the New Yorker this week, which reflects on the artist’s recent work both in and outside the traditional gallery system, and his approach towards making art that often defies categorization.  “At what point do artists using social media stop making art for the idealized art world audience they want,” the piece quotes from one of his essays, “and start embracing the new audience they have?” 
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New York Times Notes Uptick in Sales Through Instagram

January 23rd, 2017

Faberge art, via NYTThe New York Times profiles the increased potential in recent years for Instagram as a marketing tool, noting a considerable uptick in works sold through the platform.  “It has hit a sweet spot in the market for sharing information,” Anders Petterson, one of the contributors to the Hiscox Online Art Trade Report says, “but no one saw this coming as a sales tool.”
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Catherine Opie Joins Gallerists and Artists in LA Women’s March

January 23rd, 2017

Catherine Opie, via LA TimesThe LA Times has a piece today on the participation of a number of artists and gallerists in the Los Angeles protests against Donald Trump, counting Catherine Opie and a range of gallerists from across the city.  “Artists need to bring that voice of opposition to this cause — with every drop of blood and every tear,” Opie says.
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REFERENCE LIBRARY

New York – Anthony Caro: “First Drawings Last Sculptures” at Mitchell-Innes & Nash Through February 4th, 2017

January 23rd, 2017

Anthony Caro, Terminus (2013), via Art Observed
Anthony Caro, Terminus (2013), via Art Observed

In the early years of his career, Anthony Caro worked on a series of twisting, enigmatic depictions of human and animal figures, works that owed much to the spatial interrogations of Picasso and the broader canon of 20th Century European abstraction.  The works are impressive in their understanding of the gestural and conceptual operations of the era’s avant-garde, but for Caro’s career, served in part as a starting point for his own engagement with space, not only on paper or canvas, but in three dimensions.  This engagement with the dual acts of perception and depiction, sight and operation, takes center stage at Mitchell-Innes & Nash this month, as the late artist’s final sculptures are shown alongside some of his first drawings and paintings, a rare opportunity to appreciate the range of evolution the artist reached during the course of his prolific career.

Anthony Caro, First Drawings Last Sculptures (Installation View), via Art Observed
Anthony Caro, First Drawings Last Sculptures (Installation View), via Art Observed  Read More »

New York – Keith Sonnier: “Ebo River and Early Works” at Pace Gallery Through January 21st, 2017

January 22nd, 2017

Keith Sonnier, Chila (2016), via Art Observed
Keith Sonnier, Chila (2016), via Art Observed

Continuing his work with Pace Gallery, Keith Sonnier has brought a series of both new and historical works to the gallery’s uptown exhibition space.  His fourth solo show with Pace, Ebo River and Early Works features a range of works pieces by the artist, tracing his continued use of light as a central medium. Sonnier, who works in Bridgehampton, has worked with neon and industrial materials for more than forty-five years, and brings a selection of his works sharing themes of movement and space to the gallery walls.

Keith Sonnier, Lit Circle Red with Etched Glass (1968), via Art Observed
Keith Sonnier, Lit Circle Red with Etched Glass (1968), via Art Observed

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New York – “Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905–2016″ at the Whitney Museum Through February 5th, 2017

January 22nd, 2017

Stan VanDerBeek, Movie Mural (1968), via Art Observed
Stan VanDerBeek, Movie Mural (1968), via Art Observed

If there’s one distinct argument coming out of the Whitney’s expansive exhibition Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, it’s a reinforcement of the expression “the story’s in the telling.”  Drawing on a wide range of artists and collectives practicing in the late 20th Century and early 21st, the exhibition takes a decidedly narrative bent on increasingly pervasive communication technologies, and the cultural effects that these forms have left both on human interaction at large, and the art world itself.

Hito Steyerl, Factory of the Sun (2015), via Art Observed
Hito Steyerl, Factory of the Sun (2015), via Art Observed

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London – Ken Price: “A Survey of Sculptures and Drawings, 1959 – 2006″ at Hauser & Wirth Through February 4th, 2017

January 21st, 2017

Ken Price (1935 - 2012) McLean2004Acrylic on fired clay49.5 x
Ken Price, McLean (2004), all photos via Hauser & Wirth

Spanning the range of Ken Price’s career and formal interests in equal measure, Hauser & Wirth London is currently dedicating an expansive show to the American artist, from his early work in California on through a series of cups, vases and abstracted forms that underscore his relentless formal invention.  Shown in conjunction with the artist’s famously comical, graphic watercolor works, the show is an impressively deep survey of Price’s work and process.

Ken Price, Untitled (1986)
Ken Price, Untitled (1986)

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New York — Philip Guston: “Laughter in the Dark” at Hauser & Wirth Through January 28th, 2017

January 20th, 2017

Philip Guston, Alone (1971), all images via Osman Can Yerebakan for Art Observed
Philip Guston, Alone (1971), all images via Osman Can Yerebakan for Art Observed

On view at Hauser & Wirth’s temporary 22nd street location, Laughter in the Dark compiles one hundred and eighty pieces created by artist Philip Guston between 1971 and 1975.  Working feverishly at his Woodstock studio in response to the highly contentious, corruption-filled presidency of Richard Nixon, the artist’s work carries exceeding resonance in the post-election landscape of American politics.  Opening just days before Donald Trump took the presidency, the show traces several connections and common threads between Guston’s era and our own, and offers a glimpse at how art and humor may sustain a nation struggling once again with its sense of identity. Read More »

New York – Charles Long: ‘B 4 U’ at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery Through February 4th, 2017

January 19th, 2017

Charles Long, SendingLadyMotherFrame1 (2016), via Art Observed
Charles Long, SendingLadyMotherFrame1 (2016), via Art Observed

Filling the ground floor exhibition space at Tanya Bonakdar with a series of six small-scale sculptures, artist Charles Long returns to the Chelsea gallery for their eleventh exhibition together.  Drawing delicate exchanges of space and form through Long’s careful selection of elements, the show offers a playful, intuitive exploration of sculptural technique, and the conventions that place these objects on view to the public. Read More »

Amsterdam – Jean Tinguely: “Machine Spectacle” at Stedelijk Museum Through March 5th, 2017

January 18th, 2017

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Jean Tinguely, Ballet des pauvres (1961), all photos via Besiana Vathi for Art Observed

One of the pioneering artists in the concept of kinetics and movement in their works, Jean Tinguely is the subject of an expansive retrospective, Machine Spectacle, currently on view at Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum, charting the artist’s creative trajectory and body of work, and highlighting his fascination with movement and formal progression as the focus, rather than the means of his practice.  Using movement and change as modes of critical inquiry, the works on view underscore Tinguely’s understanding of the modern condition, examining capitalist spectacle and modern culture in conjunction with his work’s internal series of aesthetic decisions.

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Jean Tinguely, Le Cyclop – La Tête, collaboration with Niki de Saint Phalle (1986)

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New York – Michelle Grabner at James Cohan Through January 28th, 2017

January 17th, 2017

Michelle Grabner, Untitled (2016), via Art Observed
Michelle Grabner, Untitled (2016), via Art Observed

Artist Michelle Grabner has work on view at James Cohan Gallery in Chelsea this month, continuing the artist’s explorations of intersections between physical and social contexts for her chosen materials, and the resulting conversations between the contexts of fine art and the artist’s own life and practice. Read More »

London – John Currin at Sadie Coles HQ Through January 21st, 2017

January 16th, 2017

John Currin, Newspaper Couple (2016), via Sadie Coles
John Currin, Newspaper Couple (2016), via Sadie Coles

Artist John Currin returns to the traditional forms of the marriage portrait for a new exhibition this month at Sadie Coles’s Davies Street exhibition space, bringing his uniquely vivd painterly techniques and often wry sense of humor to bear on a series of five new canvases.  Drawing on Currin’s long study of historical forms and context, the show continues the artist’s simultaneous study and subversion of the act of portraiture. Read More »

New York – Wade Guyton: “The New York Times Paintings: November – December 2015″ at Petzel Gallery Through January 14th, 2017

January 15th, 2017

Wade Guyton, Untitled (2015), via Petzel
Wade Guyton, Untitled (2015), via Petzel

Marking an expansion and elaboration of his ongoing engagement with the materiality and phenomenology of digital media formats, Wade Guyton is presenting a series of inkjet printer-based works from late last year at Petzel Gallery this month.  Comprised of scanned and reprinted pages from the New York Times, Guyton’s body of new works reflects on both the commodity value and disposability of both images and their technologies in the modern landscape.   Read More »

New York — “Warhol, Wool, Guyton” at Nahmad Contemporary Through January 14th, 2017

January 12th, 2017

Andy Warhol, Knives (1981-82)
Andy Warhol, Knives (1981-82), All images are by Osman Can Yerebakan for Art Observed

Nahmad Contemporary is currently presenting an impressive three-person exhibition at its Madison Ave exhibition space, contextualizing the work of both Christopher Wool and Wade Guyton through the artistic lens of Andy Warhol, making the latter artist’s impact all the more apparent in the work of the former two.  Combining the appropriation of existing imagery and the borrowed aesthetics of mainstream commercial imagery with a certain sense of spare visual arrangement, the show is a striking visual tour de force, connecting diverse focal points and concepts over a shared sense of composition and technique, especially in the sense of the gallery space as a transformational context. Read More »

Berlin – Robert Morris: “Refractions” at Sprüth Magers Through January 14th, 2017

January 11th, 2017

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Robert Morris, Untitled (Williams Mirrors) (1976-77), all photos via Anna Corrigan for Art Observed

Now through January 14, Sprüth Magers in Berlin is hosting a historical exhibition of works by Robert Morris, exploring a series of six works developed over the course of the artist’s career, and often drawing on the use of mirrors and reflective surfaces to expand the viewer’s perception of space.  Pulling from some of the earliest works in Morris’s conceptual practice up to a work completed in 2014, Refractions traces Morris’s engagement with movement, space and the body, often in relation to the gallery space itself.

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Paris – Gordon Matta-Clark at Marian Goodman Gallery Through January 19th, 2017

January 9th, 2017

Gordon Matta-Clark, Conical Intersect (1975), via Marian Goodman
Gordon Matta-Clark, Conical Intersect (1975), via Marian Goodman

Reflecting on the far-reaching impact of artist Gordon Matta-Clark’s career, Marian Goodman Gallery has opened an exhibition of works by the American artist, combining collages, drawings, video and other works that trace the artist’s enigmatic explorations of space and use, and the artist’s place as a negotiator between these states of stillness and movement.

Gordon Matta-Clark, Cut Drawing (1974), via Marian Goodman
Gordon Matta-Clark, Cut Drawing (1974), via Marian Goodman

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New York – Andrew Kuo: “No to Self” at Marlborough Chelsea Through January 14th, 2017

January 8th, 2017

Andrew Kuo, 100% (9:25:2016) (2016), via Art Observed
Andrew Kuo, 100% (9/25/2016) (2016), via Art Observed

Andrew Kuo’s work functions at an intersection of the cognitive and formal.  His paintings, jagged and winding swirls of color executed in meticulously arranged grids, draw on histories of formally precise, minimalist painting from across the 20th century.  Yet at the same time, his work twists these forms through a framework of subjectivity, using corresponding texts at the bottom of his paintings to turn them into charts and datasets of sorts.  The amount of time dwelling on various subjects, personal details or grand metaphysical questions are implied through his works, often tinged with a wry sense of humor.

Andrew Kuo, TRIP (7/15/2016) (2016), via Art Observed
Andrew Kuo, TRIP (7/15/2016) (2016), via Art Observed

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New York — Julian Rosefeldt: “Manifesto” at Park Avenue Armory Through January 8th, 2017

January 6th, 2017

Julian Rosefeldt, Manifesto (2015) © Julian Rosefeldt and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Julian Rosefeldt, Manifesto (2015) © Julian Rosefeldt and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Following its Australian and German debuts throughout 2016, Manifesto, German artist Julian Rosefeldt’s highly anticipated multi-channel video installation starring Academy Award-winning actress Cate Blanchett, comes to Park Avenue Armory’s cavernous Drill Hall.  Projected on soaring screens dispersed around the empty space, Rosefeldt’s tour-de-force recites a range of influential manifestos from the history of art and philosophy through an impressively diverse range brought to life by Blanchett’s virtuosic and versatile acting ability.

Manifesto at Park Avenue Armory Photo by James Ewing
Manifesto at Park Avenue Armory Photo by James Ewing Read More »

New York – Rita Ackermann: “Kline Rape” at Hauser & Wirth Through January 14th, 2017

January 4th, 2017

rita-ackermann-kline-nurses-2015-via-art-observed
Rita Ackermann, Kline Nurses (2015), via Art Observed

Taking over Hauser & Wirth’s temporary exhibition space at 548 West 22nd Street, Rita Ackermann is currently presenting a broad range of new works drawing on her ongoing investigations into the modes and structures of mainstream painting.  A relentless experimenter with the conception, construction, and presentation of the painted canvas, Ackermann’s work here spans a range of varied approaches that further her dual interrogations of the material bounds of the painting, and the gestural or technical conceits used in its realization.

Rita Ackermann, Kline Rape III (2016), via Art Observed
Rita Ackermann, Kline Rape III (2016), via Art Observed

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London — Pat Steir at Dominique Lévy Through January 28th, 2017

January 1st, 2017

Pat Steir, Elephant Waterfall (1990), via Art Observed
Pat Steir, domini (1990), via Art Observed

Stepping into Dominique Lévy gallery space, one is immediately greeted by the towering columns of paint that make up artist Pat Steir’s waterfall paintings.  Opening her first exhibition in London in twenty-eight years, the artist’s exhibition features fourteen works made over the corresponding decades, from 1990-2011.  Tracing consistent evolutions in her style and hand in conjunction with stylistic divergences and experiments, the survey engages in an ongoing dialogue over her interests in both control and abstraction. Read More »

London – William Kentridge: “Thick Time” at Whitechapel Gallery Through January 15th, 2017

December 31st, 2016

William Kentridge, The Refusal of Time (2012), via Whitechapel Gallery
William Kentridge, The Refusal of Time (2012), all images courtesy the artist via White Chapel Gallery.

Now through January 15th, Whitechapel Gallery in London is presenting a new exhibition of work by William Kentridge, one of South Africa’s pre-eminent artists. William Kentridge: Thick Time features six large-scale works created between 2003 and 2016, spanning a range of mediums and thematics that reflect Kentridge’s intense engagement with theories of time and relativity, the history of colonialism, and revolutionary politics. Read More »

New York – Mark Van Yetter: “The Terrifying Abyss of Skepticism” at Bridget Donahue Through January 8th, 2017

December 30th, 2016

Mark Van Yetter, A Lack of Imagination Seems to be the Problem (2016), via Art Observed
Mark Van Yetter, A Lack of Imagination Seems to be the Problem (2016), via Art Observed

On view at the Bridget Donahue Gallery, the works of Mark Van Yetter demonstrate the power and playfulness of association. The Terrifying Abyss of Skepticism, composed of a series of paintings on paper, allows for multiple readings, drawing on the artist’s wide scope of influences, including ancient artifacts and art objects, old masters, graphic illustrations, and folk art.  In the expansive range of graphic possibilities and interpretive frameworks provided by these references, Van Yetter’s work calls upon the viewer to locate links between each of his works, and the historical contexts they draw on.

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New York – Joel Shapiro at Dominique Lévy Through January 7th, 2017

December 29th, 2016

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Joel Shapiro, Untitled (1980), All images via Dominique Lévy.

Now through January 7th, Dominique Lévy is hosting the major first survey of early wood reliefs by American sculptor Joel Shapiro, an exhibition that seeks to demonstrate the trajectory and development of Shapiro’s career, while foregrounding his work with pieces from the late 1970’s and ultimately culminating in a recent body of room-sized sculptural assemblages.  The wood reliefs, presented alongside a new site-specific installation, trace a practice constantly in pursuit of uses of color and mass to shape perceptions of space while exploring individual material interactions.  This marks the first time the series of wood reliefs will be comprehensively surveyed.  Read More »

New York – Paul McCarthy: “Raw Spinoffs Continuations” at Hauser & Wirth Through February 4th, 2016

December 28th, 2016

Paul McCarthy, White Snow Dwarf, Dopey (Affected Original) (2016), via Art Observed
Paul McCarthy, White Snow Dwarf, Dopey (Affected Original) (2016), via Art Observed

Returning to his ongoing fascination with the iconography and commodification of the legend of Snow White, in conjunction with reprisals of varied other series from the past 15 years of his practice, Paul McCarthy’s newest exhibition at Hauser & Wirth is a flurry of both subject matter and materials.  Massive, flaking and chipping sculptures are spread throughout the gallery’s cavernous exhibition space, each one drawing on threads of both the historical and cultural in the American psyche.  Pulling from a wide range of works that define the artist’s sculptural practice (in conversation with his video and film productions), the show offers an expansive exploration of both his sense of humor, and his keen eye for commentary.

Paul McCarthy, Puppet (2005-2008), via Art Observed
Paul McCarthy, Puppet (2005-2008), via Art Observed

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New York – Kai Althoff: “and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern)” at MoMA Through January 22nd, 2017

December 27th, 2016

Kai Althoff, Untitled (2015), Courtesy the Cranford Collection, London © Kai Althoff
Kai Althoff, Untitled (2015), Courtesy the Cranford Collection, London © Kai Althoff

Situated atop the Museum of Modern Art, Kai Althoff’s current survey exhibition, and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern), first presents itself as an elaborate visual pun, turning the sixth floor of the museum into a veritable attic space for the artist’s body of watercolors, drawings and sculpture, each shown alongside other objects in an approach to the work that opens new, and often disturbing, narratives in the progression and aesthetic explorations in the artist’s career.

Kai Althoff, and then leave me to the common swifts (Installation View), Courtesy MoMA, Photograph © Kai Althoff
Kai Althoff, and then leave me to the common swifts (Installation View), Courtesy MoMA, Photograph © Kai Althoff

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New York – Ai Weiwei’s Return to New York, at Jeffrey Deitch, Mary Boone and Lisson Gallery Through December 23rd, 2016

December 23rd, 2016

Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Lisson (Installation View), via Art Observed
Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Lisson (Installation View), via Art Observed

Ai Weiwei has returned to New York City for the first time since the return of his passport from the Chinese government, opening a quartet of exhibitions across its urban expanses that offer a strikingly deep and varied series of perspectives into the artist’s practice over the past few years.  Spread out across both locations of the Mary Boone Gallery, in addition to a show at Lisson, and one at Jeffrey Deitch Projects, the artist’s selection of works presents a nuanced look at his ongoing investment in the defense and articulation of universal human rights, moving from China, to Syria, and beyond.

Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Mary Boone (Installation View), via Art Observed
Ai Weiwei, Roots and Branches at Mary Boone (Installation View), via Art Observed

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New York — Mike Kelley: “Memory Ware” at Hauser & Wirth Through December 23rd, 2016

December 23rd, 2016

Mike Kelley, Balanced by Mass and Personification (2001), all photos via Osman Can Yerebakan for Art Observed
Mike Kelley, Balanced by Mass and Personification (2001), all photos via Osman Can Yerebakan for Art Observed

One of the most influential American artists of the past 30 years, Mike Kelley‘s considerable body of work runs a long thread of intricately connected and often curiously diverse modes of working and creating, often creating internal exchanges and conversations that further the artist’s exploration of memory, time, and personal histories.  The late artist’s Memory Ware series has long stood as one of the less explored and understood series from his catalog, even though Kelley continued to make these works until close to his untimely passing in 2012.  Consisting of hundreds of different objects, the series manifests some of Kelley’s most fundamental thematic concerns through a reliance on bizarre fusions of kitsch, often drawing collective and personal memories, American folk art, consumerist tendencies, and pop culture into close proximity. Read More »